Bottle Attributes - Beer & Soda Bottle Manufacturers

A bottle's manufacturer can say something about a bottle's age.  The following is a list of manufacturers that marked pottery and glass soda and beer bottles, a brief history,  their years of operation, and manufacturer marks. Click to view geographically.

If you have additional information on the works listed below, have a picture of a factory, find a mistake or disagree with the information that is provided please feel free to email us at Sodas and Beers.

The following manufacturers appear on pottery soda and beer bottles:

Adams, Allison & Co. Manufacturers Middlebury Summit County O. Adams, Allison & Company, (approx: 1868-approx: 1872),
Akron, OH, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles,Show distribution map of bottles with the Adams, Allison & Co. mark Put bottles made by Adams, Allison & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Frank Adams was a sewer pipe manufacturer in Middlebury, which later became a part of Akron. Byron Allison was mustered out of the Union forces in 1864 and in 1870 was listed as a stoneware manufacturer. He later went on to form what became Akron Fire Brick Company in 1873 with Delos Hart as Allison & Hart.  Adams was know to be involved in a number of ventures in Middlebury and it appears that sometime about 1870 he partnered with Allison to set up this company.  Beer bottles and fruit jars are known products.  The impression is usually near the base of the bottle. Notes
Akron Pottery Akron O Akron Pottery, (1861-1887),
Akron, OH, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Akron mark Put bottles made by Akron Pottery on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Edwin H. and Henry E. Merrill established the Akron Pottery in 1861 in Akron, Ohio.  The company was incorporated into the E. H. Merrill & Company in 1887.  The impression is usually near the base of the bottle.
N. ALIFF Aliff, Noah, (approx: 1868-approx: 1875),
Mound City, Il, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Aliff mark Put bottles made by Aliff on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Mound City Pottery was established by Cornwell Kirkpatrick in 1857.  Kirkpatrick was no doubt attracted by an inexhaustible supply of superior potters' clay.  This venture failed in 1859 due to mismanagement of the managing company and Kirkpatrick went to Anna and established a successful pottery business. By 1860, H. H. Hainer owned the pottery and attracted Moses Aliff from Westbrook, Maine, where Moses was a potter for at least 10 years at John T. Wilson's pottery.  In late June or early July of 1860 Noah Aliff left Gardiner, Maine and joined Moses in Mound City.  In Gardiner Noah worked at Frank A. Plaisted's pottery.  About 1865, a Mr. Koch operated the Mound City pottery, but by 1866 the firm was known as M. & N. Aliff.  By 1870, Noah was listed as operating the stoneware factory in Mound City, was living with Moses' wife, and Moses could not be found.  In 1880, he and two nephews were listed as potters, not manufacturers, in Pulaski Precinct.  No other records were found other than Moses shows up in Larned, Kansas in 1895.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
Vitreous Stone Bottle Warranted Not To Absorb Manufactured only by the American Bottle Co Middlebury O. American Bottle Company, (approx: 1890-approx: 1910),
Middlebury, OH, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the American Bottle Co. mark Put bottles made by American Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Not sure if this company is associated with the American Bottle Company that made glass bottles in Newark, Ohio.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.
Vitreous Stone Bottles Warranted Not To Absorb  J. Bourne Patentee Denby Codnor Park Potters Derby Bourne, Joseph, (1812-approx: 1851),
Denby, Derbyshire, England (1812-approx: 1851), Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bourne mark Put bottles made by Bourne on a shelf
Belper, Derbyshire, England (approx: 1823-1834),
Codnor Park, Derbyshire, England (1833-approx: 1851, closed 1861),
Shipley, Derbyshire, England (1845-approx: 1851, closed 1856),
Manufactured beer bottles.  Joseph Bourne came from a long line of potters. His grandfather, Richard Bourne, was associated with the Eastwood pottery in the mid-Eighteenth century.  His father, William Bourne, took over the Belper Pottery in 1800.  In 1806, workmen excavating a road near Denby found a fine clay in that area.  William Bourne leased the land in order to mine the clay and have it shipped to the Belper Pottery.  In 1809, William directed an associate, a Mr. Jager, to set up a small shop and kiln at Denby to be closer to the clay's source.  In 1812, William's son Joseph took over the operations at Denby, and the two potteries were run in association with each other. Joseph received patents in 1823 and 1848 for kiln improvements, and became a valuable asset to the pottery firm. William's last listing in the Pigot directory is in 1828, although company archives from the Denby pottery claim that he died in 1823.  In 1833, Joseph next acquired the Codnor Park pottery, established in 1820 and operated by William Burton. In 1834, the Belper pottery was closed and its operations consolidated at Denby.  By 1839, a sales office was established in London.  In 1845, Joseph acquired the pottery at Shipley, established in 1825.  In 1856, these works were closed and operations moved to Denby.  About 1852, Joseph brought his son Joseph Harvey Bourne into the firm, and it was known as J. Bourne & Son. Joseph Bourne died in 1860 and the firm carried on as J. Bourne and Son .  In 1861, the Codnor Park pottery was closed and its operations moved to Denby. Joseph Harvey died in 1869, and the company was run by his widow, Sara Elizabeth Bourne. Sara expanded and diversified the company's product lines to include insulators and limited productions of art pottery. She ran the pottery until her death in 1898, when operations were taken over by her nephews Joseph Bourne Wheeler and John Topham.  Topham withdrew from the firm in 1907 and Joseph Wheeler ran the firm until his death in 1942.  Under Wheeler's guidance, the firm expanded its wares and modernized its facilities.  In 1916, the firm became a limited liability company and in 2009 celebrated its bicentennial. Impressed bottles exits from the Bourne firms include the "Belper & Denby Potteries (1812-1833)," "J. Bourne, Belper, Denby and Codnor Park Potteries (1833-1834)," "J. Bourne, Denby and Codnor Park Potteries (1834-1851)," "J. Bourne & Son, Denby and Codnor Park Potteries (1852-1861)," and "J. Bourne & Son, Denby Pottery" (1861-1916),"  Although Shipley was a factory it does not appear impressed on any bottles.  Impression is from a description and may not be exact.  The impression is near the base of the bottle. Notes
Brantford Stoneware Brantford Stoneware Manufacturing Company, Limited, (1894-1906),
Brantford, ON, Canada, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Brantford mark Put bottles made by Brantford Stoneware Manufacturing Co., Limited on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This pottery was established in 1849 as Morton & Company, with John Morton being the principle and was located at the corner of Clarence and Dalhousie Streets in Brantford.  The business went through a series on owners until August 11, 1894, when Dr. David Lowrey, John Hemphill, and Henry Schuler incorporated the business as the Brantford Stoneware Manufacturing Co.  The business was dissolved in 1906 and the plant sold in 1907.  The mark is on the heel of the bottle or on the stopper.  Notes
N. Clark Jr Athens N. Y. Clark, Nathan, Jr., (approx: 1843-1891),
Athens, NY, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Clark mark Put bottles made by Clark on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Athens Pottery was established soon after the founding of Athens by Nathan Clark and his brother-in-law Captain Thomas Howe between 1805 and 1809, according to various sources.  Howe died in 1813 and Clark continued alone until about 1829, when he partnered with Ethan S. Fox as Clark & Fox.  This partnership lasted until 1838, when Fox bought the works and continued alone.  Later he sold the works back to Clark. Clark's son, Nathan Jr., was in control of the works in 1843.  The works operated on a large scale and branches were either established or purchased in Lyons, Mount Morris, and Rochester, New York.  Nathan Clark Jr. died in 1891 and his son, Nathan E., continued the works, but was not listed in the pottery business in 1900.  The impression is on the heel of the bottle.  Notes
John Cliff & Co. Cliff, John, & Company, (1857-1869),
Lambeth, London, England, occurs on 1 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the John Cliff & Co. mark Put bottles made by John Cliff & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Imperial Pottery was operated by Stephen Green & Co. until 1857.  In that year, the firm became John Cliff & Company.  When the Metropolitan Board required the property of the works in 1869, John Cliff moved the operation to Runcorn after gaining full control of the firm.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Notes
Cowden & Wilcox Cowden & Wilcox, (approx: 1862-aprox: 1885),
Harrisburg, PA, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cowden & Wilcox mark Put bottles made by Cowden & Wilcox on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Cowden & Wilcox were first listed together in a September 1, 1862 Federal Tax list in Harrisburg.  The pottery was located on the banks of the Pennsylvania Canal at Herr Street.  In the 1860 Census, John Cowden was listed as a journeyman in Harrisburg and Isaac Wilson resided in Lyons, New York, possibly working at Thompson A. Harrington's pottery.  In 1867, Cowden's son, Frederick H. Cowden, who worked at the pottery since 1862, joined the firm as a partner.  John Cowden died in 1872 and Frederick took his father's place.  Isaac Wilcox retired in 1885 and the firm was soon after renamed F. H. Cowden. From 1895 to 1915 the pottery was known as  F. H. Cowden & Son.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
C. Crolius Manufacturer New-York Crolius, Clarkson, (approx: 1797-1837),
New York, NY, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Crolius mark Put bottles made by Crolius on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Clarkson Crolius was one in a long line of stoneware potters that started with Georg Corcilius who immigrated to America between 1718 and 1724.  His daughters Veronica and Anna, married Johan Willem Crolius and Johannes (John) Remmi (Remmey).  Johannes Crolius, born in 1733, was the fourth child of Johan and Veronica Crolius.  Johannes (John) Crolius and Maria Clarkson were the Parents of Clarkson, who was born in 1774.  The Crolius' pottery was located on Reade Street near Broadway at a location called Potter's Hill.   When the Hill was to be leveled due to development, Clarkson Crolius, Sr. moved the works to 65 and 67 Bayard Street.  Clarkson Sr. retired from the business in 1837 and Clarkson Crolius, Jr. took over the business.  He discontinued the manufacture of stoneware at Bayard Street sometime between 1845 and 1849, and the pottery was afterwards demolished.  The impression is below the shoulder of the bottle.
Darrow & Sons Darrow & Sons, (approx: 1854-approx: 1872),
Baldwinsville, NY, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Darrow & Sons mark Put bottles made by Darrow & Sons on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  John Darrow built an earthenware pottery between the Erie Canal and Seneca River on the North side of Baldwinsville about 1845.  Three years later, Darrow moved the pottery to a spot where Crooked Brook Creek crosses Van Buren Road as a large bank of red clay, used in the production of earthenware or redware, was found there.  About 1852, stoneware production started with clay shipped from Perth Amboy, New Jersey.  Shortly afterwards, Darrow's sons, Lansing S. and Edwin S.,  joined the business as Darrow & Sons.  In 1867, the Darrows installed semiautomatic machinery for the production of flowerpots and other decorative ware using the red clay next to their factory.  About 1872, Edwin left the firm and it became J. Darrow & Son.  Sometime later and before the works closed in 1876, Lansing was in sole control of the firm.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
Dauffenbach & Geisecke Dauffenbach & Giesecke, (1870-1873),
New Ulm, Minnesota, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dauffenbach & Geisecke mark Put bottles made by Dauffenbach & Geisecke on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  When the firm of Dauffenbach, Stoeckert & Co. dissolved about in 1870, Christian Dauffenbach partnered with William Giesecke as Dauffenbach & Giesecke.  Giesecke was a retired farmer and was the county sheriff.  By 1874, this firm dissolved and Giesecke's share was acquired by William Winkelmann.  Giesecke went on to be a successful cattle dealer.  The impression is below the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
Dauffenbach, Steckert & Co. Dauffenbach, Stoeckert & Co., (1866-1870),
New Ulm, Minnesota, United States, occurs on 1 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dauffenbach, Steckert & Co. mark Put bottles made by Dauffenbach, Steckert & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This pottery was established by Christian Dauffenbach, John Stoeckert and Franklin Friedmann, who was the silent partner.  The three were immigrants; Dauffenbach and Stoeckert were from Germany and Friedmann was from Alsace Lorraine.  Before coming to New Ulm, all three were experienced potters.  Dauffenbach worked in Milwaukee as a potter for Frederick Herman.  Stoeckert may have been operating a pottery in Milwaukee in Milwaukee in 1860 as he had two boarders who were potters.  Friedmann was a potter in Goshen, Indiana, as he was the only potter listed in  that township in the 1860 Census he may have been operating a pottery there.  All three served in the Civil War.  Afterwards, Freidman and his family moved to Cedar Falls, Iowa for about a year.  There he met up with Dauffenbach and they went to New Ulm in 1866 and teamed up with Stoeckert to found the pottery there.  The three remained together until the later part of 1870.  In the 1870 Industrial Census, the pottery employed three workers and produced vessels with the capacity of twenty-eight thousand gallons valued at $3450.  When the firm split up, Dauffenbach partnered with William Giesecke to continue operating the pottery until about 1873, when he formed a partnership with William Winkelmann as Winkelmann & Dauffenbach.  They also produced firebrick.  By 1880, Dauffenbach was back in Milwaukee working as a potter.  Friedman went on to be a huckster and later operated a general store.  Stoeckert went on to operate a second pottery in New Ulm and with his son operated the pottery into the 20th Century.  The impression is below the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
G. Ebey. Denver Stoneware Company, (1897-1901),
Denver, CO, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Denver Stoneware Company mark Put bottles made by the Denver Stoneware Company on a shelf
Manufactured soft drink jugs.  This pottery started about 1881 as the Denver Architectural Terra Cotta Company and went thru several name changes ending up as the Denver Porcelain & Stoneware Company in 1896.  The following year, it became the Denver Stoneware Company and remained so until 1902 when Owens Thomas was listed as the successor to Denver Stoneware Company.  The factory was located at the Northeast corner of Ellsworth and Santa Fe Avenues.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
Doulton Lambeth Doulton & Company, (1854-1956),
Lambeth, England, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Doulton mark Put bottles made by Doulton & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.   Prior to 1854 this pottery was operated by Doulton & Watts.  This pottery manufactured a wide variety wares from simple inks and ginger beer bottles to its elaborate Royal Doulton ware.  The impression is on the heel of the bottle.
G. Ebey. Ebey, George, (1836-1866),
Winchester, IL, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ebey mark Put bottles made by Ebey on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  George Ebey came to Illinois in 1828 and worked at a pottery in Springfield, likely that of his older brother John Neff Ebey, for three years.  In January of 1832 he returned to his native state of Ohio for about a year and a half and married Matilda J. Kilpatrick.  The couple moved back to Illinois and settled at Manchester, likely at his brother John N. Ebey's pottery.  The following year, 1834, Ebey bought the Harrison Pottery in Winchester.  Two years later Ebey purchased land 1 mile North East of Winchester, where he built a stoneware pottery and operated it with Thomas. M. Kilpatrick.  It is not known how long this partnership lasted, but Ebey was listed as a sole proprietor until 1866, when the firm name became Ebey & Davis.  Ebey was continues to be listed as a potter thru the 1880 census.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
J.N.EBEY Ebey, John Neff, (1828-1855+),
Springfield, IL (1828-1832),
Manchester, IL (1832-1833),
Ripley, IL (1833-1855),
Winchester, IL (1855+), occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ebey mark Put bottles made by Ebey on a shelf
Urbana, IL (-1857+),
Chapin, IL (1859-1860),
Winchester, IL (1861-1864),
White Hall, IL (1864-1870),
Manufactured beer bottles.  John Neff Ebey had a long career as a pottery, but was much more transient that his younger brother George. He came to Illinois in 1828 and settled in Springfield and appears to have operated a pottery there until about 1832, when he moved to Manchester in Scott Count, where he met up with his brother George in 1833.  In that same year, he moved to Ripley in Brown County and established a pottery for 12 years; his longest time at any location.  He then moves back to Scott County, likely Winchester, where there is a thriving pottery industry and near where his brother George was operating.  In 1857, he shows up in Urbana as a pottery with his son.  He then unsuccessfully attempts to establish a pottery at Chapin, in Morgan County in 1859.  In 1861, he is back at Winchester as John N. Ebey & Co.  John Ebey then relocated to White Hall in 1864 and remained there until his death on November 20, 1893. Originally the firm was J. N. & L. C. Ebey, but in 1866 it became Ebey & Bro. The impression is near the face of the bottle.  Notes
V. Eichenlaub CIN WP Eichenlaub, Valentine, (1855-1857),
Cincinnati, OH, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Eichenlaub mark Put bottles made by Eichenlaub on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Eichenlaub operated a stoneware pottery from 1855 to 1857, which he sold and purchased a queens-ware store.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Notes
W. Geiger William Geiger, (approx: 1860-1870),
Schuylkill Haven, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the William Geiger mark Put bottles made by William Geiger on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Geiger purportedly came to the United States from  W�berg in 1837.  He spent some time in Philadelphia, but by 1850 he was a potter in Longswamp in Berks County Pennsylvania.  By 1860, he had relocated to Schuylkill Haven and operated a pottery there until 1870, when he moved to Mahonoy City and continued to run his pottery and later ran a nursery.  Both businesses operated until 1900, when Geiger died.  His widow carried on the nursery business until 1914.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
Henry Glazier Huntingdon, Pa Henry Glazier, (approx: 1845-approx: 1875),
Huntingdon, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Henry Glazier mark Put bottles made by Henry Glazier on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles. Glazier is purported to be the first stoneware pottery in Central Pennsylvania.  Peter Hoffman was making pottery in Huntington as early as 1796.  The exact start date of Glazier's business is not known, but Henry Glazier was born about 1808 and was living in Huntingdon in 1840 with other Glaziers.  In 1850 he was listed as a potter and remained in the business until after 1870.  It is interesting that John Glazier, Henry's father, was also a potter and lived next to him.  John was born about 1783 and was living in Huntington as early as 1810.  He may have been the son of David Glazier who owned a tavern in Huntingdon in 1796.  In the 1850 Census, John had a substantially larger real estate holdings then Henry, but that reversed by 1860.  John continued to be listed as a potter when he was 87!  Henry was listed as retired in 1880 and died in 1888. The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
Goodwin & Webster Goodwin & Webster, (approx: 1808-1840),
Hartford, CN, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Goodwin & Webster mark Put bottles made by Goodwin & Webster on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  There were two potteries on Front Street in Hartford.  The first was an earthenware pottery built in the 1790's by John Souter at Front and Potter.  He sold it to Peter Cross, who converted it to a stoneware pottery in 1805.  Horace Goodwin and Mack C. Webster purchased this property some time before 1810 and Cross built another pottery on Front Street.  By 1830, Goodwin & Webster acquired both Front Street potteries and ran them until 1840 when the firm became M. C. Webster & Son.  The works continued through several owners until about 1900.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
Goodwin Brothers Quebec Goodwin Brothers, (approx: 1851-approx:1865),
Quebec City. QU, Canada, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Goodwin Brothers mark Put bottles made by Goodwin Brothers on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  The Goodwin brothers, Henry and George, were born in England and immigrated to Quebec City.  By 1851, they were operating a china store and were later listed as importers and dealers in china and stoneware.  By 1871, the firm was known as George Goodwin & Company.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Notes
Govencroft Glasgow Govancroft Potteries, (1911-1982),
Glasgow, Scotland, England, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Govencroft mark Put bottles made by Govancroft Potteries on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The firm is listed as having been formed in 1911 or 1912.  They manufactured a wide range of stoneware, but jam jars and whiskey jugs were a specialty.  In later years, decorative wares were manufactured.  The works were last listed at the 1855 London Road address in 1982.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Notes
TH GUNTHER & BERNS SHEBOYGAN Gunther & Berns, (1863-1866),
Sheboygan, WI, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Gunther & Berns mark Put bottles made by Gunther & Berns on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Peter Berns established a pottery prior to 1860 in Sheboygan.  Theodore Gunther came to the United States in 1855 and initially worked in Detroit and Milwaukee as a potter, a trade he learned in France.  Gunther & Burns partnered in June of 1863 and built a new pottery on the south side of Wisconsin avenue a short distance west of Eighth street.  The works were called the Eastern Stoneware Factory.  The two remained together until June 28, 1866, when Gunther took sole control of the business.  This was most likely due to the death of Berns, whose widow remained in Sheboygan.  Gunther remained in business into the late 1880s.  The impression is in the center of the bottle.  Notes
W. Hare Wilmington Del Hare, William, (approx: 1837-1885),
Wilmington, DE, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hare mark Put bottles made by Hare on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  hare was purported to have come to Wilmington and purchased an existing pottery on French Street.  Hare was listed in the 1845 Wilmington Directory as a potter on French Street between 2nd and 3rd.  Later the address was identified as 212 French Street.  Between 1850 and 1860 his capacity tripled according to Census records.  The last directory listing was in 1885.  The impression appears on the face or near the base of the bottle.
Haxstun & Co. Fort Edward, NY  Haxstun & Company, (approx: 1875-1882),
Fort Edward, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Haxstun & Co. mark Put bottles made by Haxstun & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda jugs.  Andrew King Haxstun entered the pottery trade as a member of Haxstun, Ottman & Company in 1867 and was a member of the firm until 1872, when he started a wheel manufacturing business under the name of Haxstun & Griffin.  In 1875, he started another stoneware pottery in Fort Edward as a part of the firm Haxston & Company.  This company remained in business for eight years until 1882, when Haxstun left to work in a paper mill.  He later manufactured neats oil. Andrew's son Richard was also involved in both of the pottery operations and the neats oil business and continued this after his father's death in 1890.  The impression is on the shoulder of the jug.  Notes
Hill, Boss & Co. Hill, Boss & Company, (approx: 1870-approx: 1872),
Middlebury, OH, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hill, Boss & Co. mark Put bottles made by Hill, Boss & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The firm is firm must have been a short lived partnership between David Hill, who was operating a sewer pipe plant in Middlebury in 1870 and the Boss Brothers, who were manufacturing stoneware bottles in Middlebury in 1874.  Middlebury was absorbed into Akron.  One marked bottle dates 1870-1872.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Mark is based on a description and may appear differently.  Notes
Improved Ironstone New Haven, CN.  Improved Ironstone, (approx: 1850-approx: 1880),
New Haven, CN, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Improved Ironstone mark Put bottles made by Improved Ironstone on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  No information could be found on this New Haven manufacturer.  Impression is on the face of the bottle. Details of mark are not verified.
U Kendall's Factory CIN  Kendall, Uriah, (1834-1846),
Cincinnati, OH, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Kendall mark Put bottles made by Kendall on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Kendall was from Maine and established his factory on the corner of Race and Northern Row in Cincinnati.  The impression appears on the face of the bottle.
H Kennedy Glasgow Kennedy, Henry, (1886-1929),
Glasgow, Scotland, England, occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Kennedy mark Put bottles made by Kennedy on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.   Henry Kennedy operated the Barrowfield Pottery.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.
Keystone Pottery Co. Rochester Pa. Keystone Pottery Company (1890-1895),
Rochester, PA, United States,
occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Keystone Pottery Co. mark Put bottles made by Keystone Pottery Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.   William Miller and his sons along with John Gripp organized the Keystone Pottery Company in 1890.  The firm produced beer and ink bottles in addition to other wares.  One of their key markets was in Maine.  The works burned in 1895 and were not reopened due to a depressed market for stoneware bottles.  William Miller & Sons then built a brick yard on the site.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.   Notes
F. J. Krumeich Manufacturer New-ark Krumeich, Francis J., (1840-approx: 1846),
Newark, N. J., United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Krumeich mark Put bottles made by Krumeich on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles. The Krumeichs were a family of French Potters who settled in Newark. Baltharsar Krumeich was the patriarch of this family in Newark and was operating there before 1835.  Francis J. was a son and joined his father by 1840, but Baltharsar was not listed in the summer of 1840 when the Census was taken.  It appears that Francis was operating the business alone in 1840 until being joined by his brothers sometime before 1848.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Notes
L. Krumeich Newark Krumeich, Lawrence, (approx: 1853-approx: 1860),
Newark, N. J., United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Krumeich mark Put bottles made by Krumeich on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.   The Krumeichs were a family of French Potters who settled in Newark.  Lawrence was in New Jersey by 1844 and was most likely in a partnership with Francis and Philip Krumeich in 1850 as they all appear to have an 800 investment and were potters.  By 1859, Philip and Francis seem to have been at different locations and by 1862, Lawrence appears to have gotten out of the pottery business and was manufacturing fire or stove bricks.  In 1870, he was operating a brick yard.  Philip appears to have continued to operate a pottery and was still doing so in 1879. Lawrence was not listed in the 1880 Census in Newark.  Details of the top mark is not verified.  Notes
 Lovatt & Lovatt Lovatt & Lovatt, (1895-1913),
Lovatt & Lovatt, Limited, (1913-1930),
Langley Mill, Derbyshire, England, occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lovatt & Lovatt mark Put bottles made by Lovatt & Lovatt on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This pottery was established in 1865 by James Calvert for the manufacture a stoneware utility ware and bottles.  In 1883, Albert & John Lovatt joined the pottery and the name became Calvert & Lovatt.  In 1895, the Calvert family sold its interest in the pottery to the Lovatt brother who operated under the name of Lovatt & Lovatt.  In 1913, the firm became a limited liability company.  The firm liquated in 1930.   Notes
 E. H. & C. J. Merrill Middlebury Ohio Merrill, E. H. & C. J., (1847-1861),
Middlebury, OH, United States, occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Merrill mark Put bottles made by E. H. & C. J. Merrill on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Edwin H. and Calvin J. Merrill established this pottery in 1847 in Middlebury, Ohio.  The Merrills' were issued a patent for pressing bottles in 1847 and were responsible for manufacturing many of the early sided pottery bottles used by Midwestern bottlers.  The impression is usually near the base of the bottle.
 Metcalf Sunbury, Pa Metcalf, Thomas D. (approx: 1870-approx: 1890),
Sunbury, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Metcalf mark Put bottles made by Metcalf on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Thomas Metcalf grew up in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, where he learned the pottery trade at Hugh McConnell's pottery.  After serving in the Civil War, he ended up in Sunbury, where he worked as a potter.  There were potteries throughout the history of Sunbury and perhaps he eventually took over ownership of one of these, but by the 1880's he had ownership of the pottery that produced marked stoneware beer bottles.  In 1900, only his widow is listed.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
 Munderloh & Co. Montreal Munderloh & Company, (1870-approx: 1918),
Montreal, ON, Canada, occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Munderloh mark Put bottles made by Munderloh & Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  The founder of this firm, Wilhelm Christian Munderloh,  was born in Elsfleth, Germany in 1831.  He came to Montreal in 1857 and worked in the wholesale dry goods business.  Three years later he traveled back to Germany and on his return to Montreal established his own wholesale dry goods business in 1861.  In 1865, the firm became Munderloh & Steencken and in 1870 Munderloh & Company.   In 1871, W. C. Munderloh  was appointed consul to Germany and was instrumental in getting direct steamship routes between Europe and Montreal.  As commission merchants, they represented many leading manufacturers in Europe including the principle glass makers in Belgium.  They also had offices in London until at least 1915.  In 1918, the first reference was found to the firm being organized as a limited liability company.  References to Munderloh & Company continue into the 1950s.  The glazed mark is usually under the merchants mark and is much smaller.  The impressed mark is usually near the base of the bottle. Notes
 N. BERLIN STARK CO. Unknown Potter, (approx: 1845-approx: 1870),
New Berlin, OH, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the New Berlin mark Put bottles made in New Berlin on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  The village of New Berlin was a small settlement in Plain Township, Stark County, Ohio.  A search of census and other records finds no bottlers or brewers in the village, however there were distillers and a cider mill there.  Jacob Behl was listed in the 1850 Census as a potter there and in about 1867 Joel Stephens was recorded as a potter.  Stephens pottery was converted to a tile and sewer pipe works two years after he started and is not listed in the 1870 Census, but there was a brick manufacturer there in 1870.   The impressed mark is below the shoulder of the bottle. Notes
Pollock Bros. & Co. Pollack Brothers & Company, (approx: 1900-approx: 1920),
Montreal, QE, Canada, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the P. B. & Company mark Put bottles made by Pollack Brothers & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This firm was not listed in the 1895 Montreal Directory and appears on Canadian glass and pottery bottles of the period 1900 to 1920.  The firm is reported to have had a branch in Toronto briefly. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
Port-Dundas Glasgow Pottery Coy Port Dundas Pottery Company, (1828-1932),
Glasgow, Scotland, England, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Port Dundas mark Put bottles made by Port Dundas Pottery Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This works was started in 1828 and operated under various owners until it was taken over by James Miller as James Miller & Company.  By 1857, it was organized as the Port Dundas Pottery Company.  In 1866, steam power was introduced to turn the potter's wheels.  During 1930 the Port Dundas Pottery Company Limited closed down and was operated until 1932 by some of its customers.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.
POWELL BRISTOL Powell, (1780-1906),
Bristol, England occurs on 3 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Powell mark Put bottles made by Powell on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Powells were producing pottery starting about 1780 and were the second largest manufactures of stoneware bottles in Britain in 1900.  William Powell invented a new form of glazing that consisted of a cream colored body and tan colored top later known as a "Bristol Glaze."  The Powells merged with Price, Sons & Company and the firm became Price, Powell & Company in 1906 and operated under that name until 1961. The impression appears near the base of the bottle.
PRICE BRISTOL Price, (1884-1940),
Bristol, England, occurs on 40 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Price mark Put bottles made by Price on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The long history of Prices Pottery starts in 1785 with Charles Price II, who apprenticed at the pottery of Thomas Patience and his partner Joseph Gadd.  This pottery was at 3 Counterslip and near Price's father's tavern the Fourteen Stars.  Later ads touted the firm's start date as 1740.  Patience died soon after Price started his apprenticeship and Gadd took over the business.  Charles II and Gadd partnered as Gadd & Price in 1796 and the following year they moved the pottery to 123 Temple.  In 1798, Gadd died and the following year Price partnered with Joseph Read as Price & Read.  Read died in 1803, but the firm name remained until 1817, when Price was listed as the sole proprietor.  In 1803 or 1804, Price relocated to the Pottery of Joseph Alsop at 125 Temple.  In 1822, he took his son Charles III in as a partner to form the firm of Charles Price & Son.  In 1843, another son, likely Joseph, joined the firm now named Charles Price & Sons.  Charles II died in 1849 and the firm became Charles & Joseph Price.  In 1853, the firm purchased Bright's Pottery at 135 Temple and during the following years the properties in between.  On Charles III's retirement in 1863, the firm became Joseph & Charles Price & Brothers.  In 1868, the firm brought the pottery of Milsom & Melsom at 124 Temple.  The construction of Victoria Street caused much loss of property used by the firm and a new four story factory was constructed in 1875.  In 1884, the firm became Price, Sons & Company.  The Powells merged with Price, Sons & Company and the firm became Price, Powell & Company in 1906 and operated under that name till it closed. The pottery was destroyed by bombing during the Blitz attack in 1940 and the firm sold in 1961.  Although the firm was know as Price, Powell & Company in 1906, the Price cartouche continued to be used until at least the First World War.  The impression appears near the base of the bottle.  Notes
 R. C. R PHILA. Remmey, Richard C., (1859-1904),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Remmey mark Put bottles made by Remmey on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Richard Clinton Remmey took over his father's business in 1859. The Remmey pottery was one of the largest stoneware potteries in the U.S.  Between 1865 and 1870, the manufacture of domestic stoneware was gradually abandoned in favor of chemical and Bristol glazed stoneware. Robert Henry Remmey, Richard Clinton's son, took over the business after his father's death in 1904 and changed the company's name to Richard C. Remmey Son Co.  The impression is usually near the base of the bottle.
 S. Risley Norwich Risley, Sidney, (1856-1875),
Norwich, CN, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Risley mark Put bottles made by Risley on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Sidney Risley came to Norwich from Hartford in 1835 work a newly built pottery on the property of Elijah A. Bill, and Cushing Eells.  Eells sold his interest to Bill in 1845 and in 1846 Bill advertised that he was manufacturing stoneware.  In 1856, Risley purchased the land and pottery buildings from Bill and the following year listed himself as a pottery manufacture in the directories.  In 1865 Sidney's son, George L. joined his father in the business.  Sidney Risley died in 1875 and the control of the company passed to George L., who was subsequently killed in a boiler explosion in 1881.  The pottery then passed to B. C. Chance who sold it to C. B. Chamberland in 1884 who in turn sold it to Otto N. Sudenberg in 1887.  The works closed in 1895. The impression is usually near the base of the bottle.  Details of mark are not verified.  Notes
 RCP Co Akron O Robinson Clay Products Company, (1902-approx: 1975),
Akron, OH, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Robinson Clay Products Company mark Put bottles made by Robinson Clay Products Company on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Robinson-Merrill Company became the Robinson Clay Products Company sometime during 1902.  The company was operating well into the 1970s.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.  Details of mark are not verified.  Notes
 Robinson-Merrill Akron Ohio Robinson-Merrill Pottery Company, (1900-1902),
Akron, OH, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Robinson-Merrill mark Put bottles made by Robinson-Merrill Pottery Company on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was a merger of the Whitmore- Robinson Company, Markle & Son and the E, H, Merrill Company with a capital stock of $500,000.  The application for incorporation was filed on December 30, 1899 and the merger was completed on February 13, 1900.  It became the Robinson Clay Products Company sometime during 1902.  The impression is usually near the base of the bottle.  Details of mark are not verified.  Notes
 Sherwood Bros. Pottery New Brighton, Pa. Sherwood Brothers, (1879-1948),
New Brighton, PA, United States, occurs on 6 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Sherwood Bros. mark Put bottles made by Sherwood Bros. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Although building started in 1878 at Block House Run, this pottery was not completed until 1879.  George W. & William D. Sherwood made up Sherwood Brothers.  Initially they started with one kiln and small building and steadily expanded using Kittanney clay found on their property to manufacture a wide variety of wares.  By 1898, the firm became Sherwood Bros. Company, but still is referred to as Sherwood Bros.  The company closed shop in 1948. The impression is near the base of the bottle.
 Sipe, Nichols & Company Williamsport, Pa. Sipe, Nichols & Company, (approx. 1875-approx 1876),
Williamsport, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Sipe, Nichols & Company mark Put bottles made by Sipe, Nichols & Company on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  William Sipe is reported to have come to Williamsport in 1863. In 1867 he was listed as a conduction and by 1869 was operating a pottery on W. Fourth St.  He learned the trade from his father in York County.  By 1875, Sipe had joined with Joseph Nichols, a coal dealer, and A. S. Young, a lumber dealer, to form Sipe, Nichols and Co.  This new firm operated a pottery on Market St. at the junction of Philadelphia & Erie Railroad.  By 1877, this location was operated by the firm of Moore, Nicholas & Co. and Sipe had returned to the W. Fourth St location to run his old pottery.  By 1879, had brought his sons into the firm. They continued to operate until 1893.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
 SMITH & DAY MANUFACTURERS NORWALK, CONN Smith & Day, (approx: 1843-1848),
Norwalk, CN, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Smith & Day mark Put bottles made by Smith & Day on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Asa Smith established his pottery in South Norwalk in 1825.  He joined with Noah Selleck and the firm went under the name of Selleck & Smith from 1837 until 1843 with Noah S. Day became Smith's partner.  Day was purported to be a poor businessman and the firm of  Smith & Day was replaced by A. E. Smith & Sons in late 1848 or early 1849.  Sometime between 1866 and 1869, the firm became A. E. Smith's Sons and in 1874 it was incorporated as the A. E. Smith's Sons Pottery Company.  The later firm failed in 1887 and the works eventually became the property of the Norwalk Pottery Company.  The impression is below the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
 PATENT PRESSED W. SMITH Smith, Washington, (approx: 1839-1863),
New York, NY, United States, occurs on 9 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Smith mark Put bottles made by Smith on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Smith operated the Greenwich Pottery in New York City.  It was located at 21 West 18th in 1839 and 1857.  He may have been operating before 1839.  Smith manufactured pressed beer bottles, which he claimed were manufactured by a patented process.  Smith retired from business in 1863 and it was carried on by his son until 1870.  The impression is near the base of the bottle.
 B. P. SOPER Soper, Burtis P.  (approx: 1855-1865),
Galesville, NY, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Soper mark Put bottles made by Soper on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The exact dates of Soper's operation is not certain.  He never lists as a potter in Census, Tax or Directory listings.  He is listed as a laborer in 1850 and according to sources he worked at a pottery in Fort Edward at that time.  According to one source he was a member of the firm of Farrar & Soper at Galesville from 1852 to 1854, but another states the partner was Kingsley Soper, also a potter.  About 1865 he likely made a piece for for a Julia Soper at Fort Edward.  Soper was listed as a farmer in most records and it seems likely he farmed during the season and worked as a potter during the Winter months.  Since the pottery at Fort Edward was a well established firm and it is unlikely Soper operated it, Soper was not a major operator and is listed as a resident of North Easton in the 1850, 1860 and 1870 Censuses, Galesville had a smaller pottery that had many operators, and North Easton is close to Galesville, it seems likely that Soper operated the Galesville pottery for a brief period of time, but this is speculation.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
J. STIER Stier, Jacob, (1843-approx: 1860),
Upper Mount Bethel, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Jacob Stier mark Put bottles made by Jacob Stier on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Jacob Stier was a journeyman potter who established a large pottery at Dills Ferry along the Delaware River in Mount Bethel Township.   In 1830, he was located in Greenwich, New Jersey and in 1840 he was located in Nockamixon Township, where a number of redware potters plied their trade.  Purportedly in 1843, he established the pottery at Dills Ferry.  The pottery was definably operating in 1850 and by 1864 was known as J. Stier & Sons.  In 1870, the pottery was being operated by Joseph Sapple.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
John Stoeckert Stoeckert, John, (1870-approx: 1905),
New Ulm, MN, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the John Stoeckert mark Put bottles made by John Stoeckert on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  When the firm of Dauffenbach, Stoeckert & Co. dissolved in about 1870, John Stoeckert left and established another pottery in New Ulm. Sometime before 1895, brick making was undertaken at the pottery.  Even though brick making appears to have been the only occupation of the Stoeckert brothers in 1900, Stockert's pottery was one of four Minnesota potteries listed in an 1896 government survey.  The 1905 Minnesota Census does not list John Stoeckert and "Sold" is marked next to the three remaining Stoeckert brothers, who are not listed with any occupation. The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.   Notes
Swank & Co Johnstown, PA Swank, Jacob, & Company, (1856-approx: 1882),
Johnstown, PA, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Swank & Co. mark Put bottles made by Swank & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles. There is a fair amount of confusion regarding this pottery in Johnstown, at least in the early and ending years.  Josiah Swank was operating a pottery on his father's farm near Hooversville in the mid-1840s.  By the end of the decade he had moved his operation to Davidsville.  Jacob apprenticed with his brother on the family farm until 1848 when he left to work at a pottery in Schellsburg for six months.  Jacob returned to operate the pottery on the family farm and was operating it in 1850.  Later he went to work at a pottery in Bedford and by 1852 was working with his brother Josiah in Davidsville. There were no potters listed in the 1850 Johnstown Census, but there was a brick maker listed.  Some time prior to 1856 a James Hamilton was operating the Johnstown Pottery.  In 1854 or thereafter, Jacob came to Johnstown and by 1856,  was a member of the firm of J. Swank & Co.  The other member was either his brother Josiah or brother Hiram or both.  By 1860, Hiram was a member of the firm and in 1862, Hiram and Jacob started a hardware company under the name J. & H. Swank.  The two business operated concurrently until 1882 or 1887, when Hiram took full control of the pottery and Jacob the hardware business.  Hiram branched into refractory brick and fixtures and opened a new plant in Irvonia in 1910; at which time the firm was known as Hiram Shank's Sons.  Other acquisitions followed and the firm was sold to TYK Corporation in 1982.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
 Troy Factory Seymour, Israel, (1819-1852),
Troy, NY, United States, occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Troy Factory mark Put bottles made by Troy Factory on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Troy pottery factory was started by John Gifford about 1804. Between 1810 and 1815 he partnered with Josiah Chapman. About 1815 Gifford retired, and Chapman operated the pottery until he sold it to Israel Seymour in 1819. Seymour marked his ware with "Troy" and "TROY FACTORY" in conjunction with and with out his name.  He was succeeded by his son Walter J. Seymour.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
 Tyler & Co. Tyler & Company, (1859-1861),
Troy, NY, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Tyler & Co. mark Put bottles made by ATyler & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  When the firm of Thompson & Tyler dissolved in 1859, Isaac Tyler, one of the principles, partnered with Frederick Wetmore to operate the pottery in Troy.  They sold the business to William J. Seymour in  1861.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.  Notes
 Wallabout Pottery Brooklyn Wallabout Pottery, (approx: 1845-approx: 1860),
Brooklyn, NY, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wallabout Pottery mark Put bottles made by Wallabout Pottery on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  There were several potteries on the Wallabout Canal in Brooklyn.  It is not known which produced these bottles.
 W. S. & Co-H Webster, Smith & Company, (approx: 1894-approx: 1918),
Halifax, NS, Canada, occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Webster, Smith & Co. mark Put bottles made by Webster, Smith & Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  Webster, Smith & Co. were china and crockery dealers that appeared to have jobbed stoneware ginger beer bottles for bottlers in the Maritime region of Canada.  They also had a store at Saint Johns, Newfoundland.  Few records have been found on this company to date. The glazed mark is usually under the merchants mark and is much smaller or is impressed on the reverse at the heel.  Notes
 J. F. Weeks Weeks, Frederick H., (1890-approx: 1915),
Akron, OH, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Weeks mark Put bottles made by Weeks on a shelf
Manufactured mineral water jugs.  The Weeks pottery was established in 1882 and known as Weeks, Cook & Weeks until 1886, when it became Weeks Brothers; the brothers being Arthur J. and Frederick H. Weeks.  In November of 1890, Arthur left the firm and purchased the pottery works of F. W. Rockwell & Co.  Frederick continued to operate the old pottery, but spent more and more of his time in the lumber and construction business.  He continued to advertise as late as 1913 as a stoneware dealer.  His 1891 design patent for a distinctive shaped jug was used on several types of vessels. The embossed mark is found on the base of the container.  Notes
 West Troy Pottery West Troy Pottery, (1863-1899),
Watervliet (West Troy), NY, United States, occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the West Troy mark Put bottles made by the West Troy Pottery on a shelf
Manufactured mineral water jugs.  The West Troy pottery was established about 1863 by George Seymour, who may have been related to earlier family of Seymour potters  in Troy, New York.  The firm was operated  by a number of individuals and partnerships ending with John L. Russell who closed the business in 1899.  The impression is on the shoulder of the jug.  Notes
The Western Pottery Man'f'g Co. Denver, - Colo.  Western Pottery Manufacturing Company, (approx: 1905-1919),
Denver, CO, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Western Pottery  mark Put bottles made by Western Pottery on a shelf
Manufactured mineral water jugs. The Western Pottery Manufacturing Company was organized with $250,000 in August of 1905 by Denver businessmen.  The firm took over the Queen City Pottery Works and the Denver China and Pottery Company; both in Denver.  The main location was cattycorner from the Denver China and Pottery location on Alcott Street at 16th. $100,000 in improvements were made to the facilities.  During 1919, the firm became simply the Denver Pottery Company.  The mark is on the body of the jug.  Notes
N. A. White & Son Utica N. Y.  White, Nicholas A., & Son, (approx: 1881-1889),
Utica, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the N. A. White & Son mark Put bottles made by N. A. White & Son on a shelf
Manufactured soda jugs. The White Pottery in Utica had a long history starting in 1826 and 1827 when two potteries were established along the Erie Canal.  Noah White eventually acquired both of these works and it was operated by various partnerships of Noah, his sons and his grandson.  In 1881, Nicholas A. White, Noah's son, and Nicholas' son Charles N. took control of the works under name of N. A. White & Son.  Nicholas died in 1886, but the firm continued to be operated under this name by Charles until it ran into financial difficulties in 1889.  The firm was reorganized as the Central New York Pottery in 1890.  Impression is on the shoulder of the jug.  Notes
 F. T. Wright & Son Stoneware Taunton Mass Wright, Franklin T., & Son, (approx: 1870-1904),
Taunton, MA, United States, occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wright mark Put bottles made by Wright & Son on a shelf
Manufactured soda jugs.  Franklin T. Wright started a stoneware pottery some time between 1850 and 1859.  Between 1861 and 1870, he took his son Solon into the business.  Franklin died in 1882.  The company was last listed in the 1904 Taunton Directory.  The impression is on the shoulder of the bottle.

The following manufacturers appear on glass soda and beer bottles:

 Albany Glass Works Albany Glass Works, (1847-1851),
Albany, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Albany mark Put bottles made by Albany Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured at least one soda bottle and marked flasks and a marked pickle bottle.  There are no known predecessor or successor firms.  Daniel O. Ketchum, who was associated with the firm in Albany, whet to Brooklyn and established the Hamilton Glass Works in 1851.  The works were offered for sale during the same year and finally auctioned in early 1852. The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.   Notes
A. Alexander & Co. Leeds London Alexander, Alfred, & Company, (approx: 1884-1912),
London, ENG, England, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Alexander mark Put bottles made by Alexander & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1882, this firm was know as Alexander & Austin and by 1885 was Alfred Alexander & Company.  This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
 A. G. W. Alexandria Glass Works, Incorporated, (1905-1915)
Alexandria, VA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Alexandria mark Put bottles made by Alexandria Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This company was founded on May 10, 1905 with capital of $25,000.  Two of its principles, Henry Schnell and Joseph Ramsey, were associated with the founding of the Virginia Glass Company, also of Alexandria, and resigned from the newly formed company in the spring of 1906.  The firm made a specialty of flint or clear glass. The capital was increase to $75,000 in 1912.  At that time about 150 men and boys were employed. The company was reorganized as the Alexandria Glass Company in July of 1913. It closed in the spring of 1915 and auctioned in September of that same year.  By November of 1916, the factory was acquired by and reopened as a plant of the Old Dominion Glass Company.  By this time Old Dominion also had acquired the Belle-Pre factory, which was nearby. A devastating fire destroyed the plant in February of 1917.  The markings usually occur on the reverse heel of the bottle.  This same mark was used by the American Glass Works near Pittsburgh, but this company was defunct two years prior to the Alexandria operations starting.  The later firms bottles are mostly marked on Southern clear or flint soda bottles and usually occur with crown tops.  American's bottles are usually aqua in color.   Notes
A. B. CO. A B C  A B American Bottle Company, (1905-1929),
Chicago, IL, United States, Occurs on 65 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the American mark Put bottles made by American Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured both beer and soda bottles. Articles of incorporation were filed on August 22, 1905 and issued soon after.  This company was a consolidation of the Streator Bottle & Glass Company, the Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Company and the Ohio Bottle Company, which formed in August of 1904 with the consolidation of the E. H. Everett Glass Company, Reed & Company, the Massillon Bottle & Glass Company and the Wooster Glass Company.  The American Bottle Company was sold to the Owens Bottle company in 1916, but the name was retained until 1929, when it was merged into the Owens-Illinois Glass Company.  Some of the marks are proceed with or  have following the mark, marks such as "0-SABCo" or "8-S."  These marks may indicate the plant where the bottles were blown.  In later years, the "S" indicated the Streator, Illinois (old Streator) plant and "N" the Newark, Ohio (old Everett) plant and the number the year of manufacture.  The markings usually occur on the reverse heel of the bottle, but occasionally on the bottle's base.
 A G W American Glass Works, (approx: 1893-1903), See Glass Factory
Redman Mills, PA, United States, Occurs on 38 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the American mark Put bottles made by American Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  According to 1894 Congressional records, the predecessor to this company was founded on February 17, 1887.  At this time the company was called the American Glass Works Limited. Some time between 1892 and 1894, Limited was dropped and Christian F. Leng, sometimes listed as Frederick C. Leng, became proprietor of the firm.  Two versions of the Hopkins 1896 map show Frd'k Ling (sic) Glass House in Redman Mills.  In 1899, the company employed 87 and their specialty was soda and beer bottles as well as fruit jars.  There are invoices for the firm that are dated 1902 and 1903 for beer bottles. This factory was listed as closed in 1904 and 1905 and does not appear on the 1905 Hopkins map. During 1904 and 1905 Leng appears to have been a jobber and not a manufacturer, but was using the American Glass Works as a firm name.  Soon after and by 1907, Leng married, moved to New York, and was a successful broker.  The markings usually occur on the reverse heel of the bottle, but occasionally on the bottle's base.   Notes
 A G W L American Glass Works Limited, (1887-approx: 1893),
Redman Mills, PA, United States, Occurs on 57 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the American mark Put bottles made by AAmerican Glass Works Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  Redman Mills is currently in Baldwin Township along the Monongahela River.  According to 1894 Congressional records this company was founded on February 17, 1887 and does not appear to have been connected with any earlier American Glass Works or Companies.  At this time the company was a limited liability company. The track of land where the glass house was to be built was owned by William Redman and no glass house is shown there on the 1886 Hopkins map.  On this map and within Redman's property is a lot and building owned by John Miller.  Miller was a grocer at Redman Mills as early as 1880 and postmaster there in 1883.  He acquired Redman's property soon after and became one of the founding members of the American Glass Works Limited.  His capital contribution was likely the building site for the American Glass Works and his store was located directly adjacent to it. The factory itself was strategically located between the Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad and the Monongahela Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  This company advertised in the National Bottlers Gazette in 1887, 1889, 1890, and 1892.  The 1889 ad states that the factory was being expanded 60%.  Based on various records, the firm appears to have been liquidated about 1893 and became the American Glass Works owned by Christian F. Leng.  The markings usually occur on the base of the bottle, but occasionally on the bottle's reverse heel.   Notes
 A G CO. Annapolis Glass Company, (1885-approx; 1892),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Annapolis Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by Annapolis Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured at least one beer bottle.  These works were incorporated on May 12, 1885 on Horn Point later known as the Eastport section of Annapolis with 3,000 in capital stock.  The attraction of Annapolis was a fine quality of glass sand found on the Severn River nearby.  The Annapolis Glass Co. was offered for sale in 1891 and a glass works was listed in a 1893 report.  The Severn Glass Co. was the successor and was incorporated in 1897.  The markings are on the base.  Notes
 A. ARBOGAST PITTS Arbogast, Alexander, (approx: 1858-1863),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Arbogast mark Put bottles made by Arbogast on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  Believed to be Alexander Arbogast a Pittsburgh glass blower in 1850 and 1857 and who owned a window glass factory in New Castle, Pennsylvania from 1863 to 1867.  He was the older brother of Philip Arbogast, who invented an early automated glass blowing machine.  The markings are on the base.
B B., (1895-1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the B mark Put bottles made by B on a shelf
Manufactured on beer bottles.  This mark appears on a champagne beer bottle from Jamestown, New York.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.   Notes
Bagley & Co Ld Makers Knottingley Bagley & Company Limited, (1898-1975),
Knottingley, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bagley & Co. mark Put bottles made by Bagley & Co. Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The origins of this glass factory purportedly started in May of 1871, when cousins John William and William Bagley and John Wild formed Bagley, Wild & Company.  John Wild died in 1884 and purportedly in 1890 the firm became Bagley & Company.  In 1898, it became a limited liability company.  The company was an early adaptor of semi- and fully automated bottle making machinery and held the European license for the Owens machine.  In 1912, it started the production of pressed glassware and a subsidiary company was founded called the Crystal Glass Company, but it continued to manufacture beverage bottles into the late 1960s.  The company went through a series of sales, ending with closure in 1975.  It was reopened in 1995 by Stolzle Oberglas AG, an Austrian firm.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.   Notes
B B & Co Baker Brothers & Company, (approx: 1858-1916),
Baltimore, MD, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Baker Brothers & Co. mark Put bottles made by Baker Brothers & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles. Sometime during 1856 or 1857, the firm of Baker & Brother became Baker Brothers & Company.  This firm sold window glass, glassware, bottles and chemicals.  The firm continue to be listed thru the 1917 Baltimore Directory. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.   Notes
WM BARNARD & SONS LONDON W. B. & S. Barnard, William, & Sons, (approx: 1860-approx: 1930),
London, England, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Barnard & Sons mark Put bottles made by Barnard & Sons on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company advertised being in business over half a century in 1920 and was still advertising Codd bottles in 1926.  The markings appear on the heel or base of the bottle.
BARNETT & FOSTER MAKERS LONDON Barnett & Foster, (1858-1997),
London, England, Occurs on 7 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Barnett & Foster mark Put bottles made by Barnett & Foster on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  This company manufactured diving apparatus and branched into bottling supplies.  Operated the Niagara Works a bottling equipment and supply house.  The company became a division of Borthwicks.  The Barnett & Foster division moved from London to Wellingborough in 1968 and was acquired by Danisco in 1997.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
B F G CO Beaver Falls Glass Company, (1869-1879),
Beaver Falls, PA, United States, occurs on 14 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Beaver Falls mark Put bottles made by Beaver Falls Glass Co. on a shelf
William Modes purchased land for this works in 1869.  He had previously owned a glasshouses in the Pittsburgh area.  All references give 1879 as the final date and this is supported by the marked bottles. Since the Beaver Falls Glass Company Limited was organized on January 1, 1887, it is not known what the status of the works was in the years 1880 to 1887.  The Limited must not have been successful, since a few years later in 1890, when the Canton Glass Works burned to the ground, its equipment and 120 workers moved to the rented Beaver Falls Glass Company for a couple of months. The Imperial Glass Works occupied the site in 1900.  The markings are on the reverse heel or the bottle's base.
 B P B Co Belle-Pre Bottle Company, (1901-1911),
Alexandria, VA, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Belle Pre Bottle Co. mark Put bottles made by Belle-Pre Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Belle-Pre Bottle Co. was incorporated in the state of Delaware in 1901 by a number of Washington businessmen.  The factory was built in Alexandria, Virginia in 1902.  Its specialty was the manufacture of milk bottles, but they appear to have made other types of bottles in the early years.  By 1907, the factory was manufacturing milk bottles exclusively at a rate of one million a month and employed 250 men.  The works closed in November of 1911 and was involved in litigation until the fall of 1912, when it was sold to the Old Dominion Glass Co.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
 B. G. Co. Belleville Glass Company, (1882-1886),
Belleville, IL, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Belleville mark Put bottles made by Belleville Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This company was organized in the early part of 1882 with capital of $25,000 and the plant was operating in the fall of that year employing about 75 men producing 100 gross bottles and fruit jars.  Later that same, year a second five pot furnace was in the making and would employ an additional 50 men.  By February 1886, the factory was discovered to no longer be operating.  Soon after, the company was in receivership.  According to some accounts, Adolphus Busch, of brewing fame, purchased the works in 1886, but the receiver reported the company had no assets in 1888.  In 1889, the glass works were back in operation employing 98 men and boys.  Busch modernized and expanded the plant in 1891, but in 1894 the factory closed because of the depression of 1893.  Busch reopened the plant in 1899 after additional modernizations.  In 1905, the plant became part of the American Bottle Company.   The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
 B. B. G. Co. Berney-Bond Glass Company, (1905-1930),
Bradford, PA, United States,
Clarion, PA, United States,
Hazelhurst, PA, United States,
Smethport, PA, United States, Occurs on 6 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Berney-Bond mark Put bottles made by Berney-Bond Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This company was formed in 1905 with the merger of the Berney Glass Company and the Bond Glass Company.  The company was purchased by Owens-Illinois in 1930.  The markings are on the base and occurs with a mold number.
B G W Binghamton Glass Works, (1882-1893),
Binghamton, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Binghamton mark Put bottles made by Binghamton on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  This glass works appears to have been formed about 1880 by Binghamton businessmen and was known as the Binghamton Glass Company.  In 1882, William Burrows acquired the works and it became known as the Binghamton Glass Works. Burrows was involved in a series of other glass factories in Brooklyn, Newburgh, Honesdale, and East Stroudsburg.  The Binghamton plant was the primary manufacturer of bottles for Dr. Kilmer and his swamp root empire, but also manufactured druggists, flask, beer and soda water bottles.  Burrows was involved in the works until 1893, when it was organized as the Binghamton Glass Company, a partnership of John B. and Milton Yetter, Frank L. Dennis and William Burrows.  In 1897, the company was incorporated and continued to offer a general line of bottles and jars.  The company never installed automatic bottle machines and was not able to compete with the changing tide.  The company shifted its focus to specialty blown wares and as a wholesalers of glass for other manufacturers.  They continued to manufacture glass until about 1926.  The company remained active until about 1945, when the last owners died and the property was sold.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
BODE G A B Bode, G. A., (approx: 1895-1905),
Chicago, IL, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bode mark Put bottles made by Bode on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  Believed to be Gustav A. Bode of Chicago.  The GAB mark appears on a Chicago Hutchinson bottle and the BODE mark was reported on another Hutchinson.  Bode was a bottlers supplier and most likely did not manufacture bottles but was a reseller like Karl Hutter of New York or Twitchell & Brother of Philadelphia.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
J. Bodine & Son
BRIDGETON N. J.
Bodine, Joel, & Sons, (1846-1855),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States, Occurs on 6 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bodine mark Put bottles made by Bodine & Sons on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  Two different forms of the mark were used.  The Bodines purchased the works from John G. Rosenbaum in 1846.  In 1855, they sold the glass works to Maul, Hebrew & Company, who only operated it for a short period until they failed.  The works were then purchased by General David Potter and Francis I. Bodine (Potter & Bodine) in 1857 or 1858 and operated under the name of the Bridgeton Glass Works.   The markings appear on the reverse side of the bottles.
C. B. G. CO. Muncie Glass Company, (1888-1900),
Boldt, Charles, Glass Company,
(1900-1906), Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Boldt mark Put bottles made by Boldt Glass Co. on a shelf
Boldt, Charles, Company, (1906-1919),
Boldt, Charles, Glass Company, (1919-1929),
Muncie, IN, United States, (1888-1910),
Cincinnati, OH, United States, (1900-1924),
Huntington, WV, United States, (1913-1929),
Manufactured beer bottles. Charles Boldt was a great example of a self-made man.  He started his career as a bookkeeper with Drexler, Immohr & Co., who were bottlers in Louisville.  After a brief stint with the Louisville Post Office, he organized the Muncie Glass Company on Nov. 16, 1888, at a mere 20 years of age.  In 1900, he built a second glass factory in Cincinnati and renamed the firm The Charles Boldt Glass Company on April 30, 1900.  The Cincinnati plant manufactured flint and amber ware.  In 1901, a branch office was opened in Louisville, which also produced liquor labels and was headed by his old business acquaintance, Fred J. Drexler.  Soon after, new plants were built in Cincinnati to produce boxes and corrugated paper products. As the company expanded into bottlers supplies, corrugated paper, boxes, and labels, they changed the name to reflect the change in business purpose.  The firm's new name became The Charles Boldt Company on May 1, 1906.  They also started to focus on manufacturing whiskey bottles.  The company acquired one of two licenses to use the Owens machines to manufacture liquor bottles and further focused in that area.  In 1910, the Muncie plant burned to the ground, the company was incorporated and the Owens Bottle Machine Co. bought shares in the company.  It does not appear that the Muncie plant was rebuilt, but the company maintained an office there until 1915.  In the following year, 1911, the capacity of the Cincinnati plant was doubled and in 1913, a new plant was opened in Huntington, West Virginia.  In 1916, Boldt bought back Owens' share in the business.  Prohibitions passage in 1919, was a major blow to the Boldt Company now entrenched in the liquor industry.  In that year, the name was changed to the Charles Boldt Glass Company on October 29, the Louisville operation was closed down, the Owens Company bought a controlling interest in the business, and the focus was shifted to producing other ware including soft drink bottles and preserve wares. In 1924, the Cincinnati plant was shut down and operations consolidated to the Huntingdon plant. Bolt closed a deal to sell the company to the Owens-Illinois Company in 1929 and died the next day, leaving his wife an estate of $10,000,00.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
BOLEY MFG. CO. N. Y. Boley Manufacturing Company, (approx: 1897-1916),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 29 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Boley mark Put bottles made by Boley Manufacturing Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soft drink bottles.  Benjamin Boley was involved selling bottles by at least 1890 at 96 S. 5th av. & 90 Sheriff and was president of this company as listed in a 1897 Brooklyn Directory at the Cannon Street address.  He was still involved in selling bottles in 1916.  Reported directory lists span 1898 to 1911.  The office was located at 52 Cannon Street in New York City.  A demijohn factory was located in Orleans, New York and burned in 1907.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
 B & M S Co. Bottlers & Manufacturers Supply Company, (approx: 1900-1920),
Long Island City, NY, United States, Occurs on 16 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the B & M S Co. mark Put bottles made by Bottlers & Manufacturers Supply Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company is mentioned in various documents from 1900 to 1915.  It became the Peerless Glass Company in 1920 and later became a branch of Thatcher, in 1932, for the manufacture of milk bottles.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
BRATBY & HINCHLIFF LONDON & MANCHESTER Bratby & Hinchliffe, (approx: 1877-approx: 1900),
Manchester, England, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bratby & Hinchliffe mark Put bottles made by Bratby & Hinchliffe on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Bratby & Heinchliffe trademarked a number of images in 1877.  They were aerated water engineers and manufacturing chemists.  Later a branch was opened in London.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
BRATBY & HINCHLIFF LIMD LONDON & MANCHESTER Bratby & Hinchliffe Limited, (approx: 1900-approx: 1985),
Manchester, England, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bratby & Hinchliffe mark Put bottles made by Bratby & Hinchliffe Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Bratby & Heinchliffe were aerated water engineers and manufacturing chemists.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
BREFFITS MAKERS LONDON Breffit, Edgar F., & Company, (approx: 1860-1913),
Castleford, England, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Breffits mark Put bottles made by Breffit & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Winterbottom & Jessop purchased four acres of land from Lord Houghton and erected the Ryebread Glass Works in 1834.  Edgar Breffit bought the business in 1844 and renamed it Breffits Glass Works.  By 1868, E. Breffit & Company were listed as proprietors of the Aire and Calder Glass Bottle Works.  By 1884, it became a limited liability company.  This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
B & B S Co Newark N. J. Brewers' & Bottlers' Supply Company, (1902-1913),
Newark, NJ, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Brewers & Bottlers Supply Co. mark Put bottles made by Brewers & Bottlers Supply Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The company was incorporated on August 14, 1902 and was located at 52 Clinton Street.  It appears to have originally been run by a Souda & Graham, who were listed as proprietors in 1904 at 49 Academy Street.  The company appears to have struggled, but by 1907, it was taken over by William F. Hoffmann and some associates and relocated to 52 & 54 Lafayette Street.  They greatly expanded and advertised heavily in the directories until 1913, when it appears to have gone inactive.  Hoffman appears to have turned his attention to the Standard Oil Supply Company, another corporation he owned, also located at 52 Lafayette Street. The corporation continued until at least 1918, but no longer was listed in the directories nor did it advertise.  Hoffman also owned a company called the South Jersey Glass Works and the Brewer's & Bottlers' Supply Company bottles were likely made there.  The markings appear on the base of the bottles.  Notes
BRIDGETON GLASS WORKS N. J. Bridgeton Glass Works, (1855-1870),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States, Occurs on 10 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bridgeton mark Put bottles made by Bridgeton Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The Bridgeton Glass Works was operated by Joel Bodine & Sons until 1855, when they sold it to Maul, Hebrew & Company, who only operated it for a short period until the failed.  The works were then purchased by General David Potter and Francis I. Bodine (Potter & Bodine) in 1855 or 1856 at sheriffs sale and operated under the name of the Bridgeton Glass Works.  In 1863, it became F. & J. Bodine, but at least one bottle from this period indicates the name Bridgeton Glass Works was retained. About 1870, it became the Cohansey Glass Manufacturing company.  The markings appear on the reverse side of the bottles or across the front and reverse sides.
Bright & Sons Makers of Glass Bridlington Bright & Sons, (approx: 1870-approx: 1875),
Bridlington, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bright & Sons mark Put bottles made by Bright & Sons on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  No information could be found on this firm or a glass works in Bridlington.  A marked bottle is dated 1873, so production must have been limited.  The markings appear on the heel of the bottle and ring the base.  Each line on the illustration represents a different side to the bottle.   Notes
British Siphon Co. British Siphon Company, (approx: 1905-approx: 1930),
London, England, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the British Siphon Co. mark Put bottles made by British Siphon Co. on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  No tangible information could be found on this firm.  It may have been an successor of a company called the British Siphon Manufacturing Company and the predecessor of a limited liability company.  The markings are on the face of the bottle below the etching.   Notes
Brooke Brooke Glass Company, (1891-approx: 1899),
Wellsboro, WV, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Brooke mark Put bottles made by Brooke on a shelf
Appears on soda-shaped milk bottles.  This company was chartered in 1891 by the West Virginia Legislature.  The operation ran into problems in 1897, when it was put up for auction, but appears to have operated sporadically until about 1899.  In 1908, the plant was reopened as the Crescent Glass Company, which was in operation until at least 1998.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.   Notes
PHILADA GLASS WORKS BURGIN & SONS Burgin & Sons, (1852-1903), See Glass Factory
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Burgin mark Put bottles made by Burgin & Sons on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This works was purported to have been established in 1841 by Burgin, Pearsall & Hartshorne as the Philadelphia Vial and Bottle Works.  The works were north of East Girard on what is today Montgomery Street. During 1852 or early in 1853 the firm went from Burgin, Fowler & Company to Burgin & Sons and remained in operation well into the Twentieth Century. The factory burned in 1875 causing $20,000 in damages and again 1879 and 1887, when some out buildings burned.  This factory was one of the first to use gas powered furnaces.  The name changed to Burgin & Sons Glass Company in 1903 and was involved in a law suit in 1910.  It closed soon afterwards.  The markings are on the front of the bottles.
 BGCO Burlington Glass Company, (1877-1909),
Hamilton, ON, Canada, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Burlington mark Put bottles made by Burlington Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Burlington Glass works started in 1875 and was  incorporated in 1877.  It was sold to the Diamond Glass Company, of Montreal, in 1909.  The markings are on the reverse side on the heel.
A. B. G. CO. Busch, Adolphus, Glass Company, (1886-1892),
Belleville, IL, United States, (1886-1892),
Saint Louis, MO, United States, (1891-1892), Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Busch mark Put bottles made by Adolphus Busch Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soft drink bottles.  In 1886, Adolphus Busch purchased the bankrupt Belleville Glass Works and formed the Adolphus Busch Glass Company.  In 1891, a new plant was opened in Saint Louis near the Anheuser- Busch brewery at 3rd & Barton. The following year, 1892, the Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Company was organized.  The markings are on the base of the bottles.  Notes
A. B. G. M. CO. BELLEVILLE ILLS. Busch, Adolphus, Glass Manufacturing Company, (1892-1926),
Belleville, IL, United States, (1892-1905),
Saint Louis, MO, United States, (1892-1926), Occurs on 18 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Busch mark Put bottles made by Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soft drink bottles.  In 1886, Adolphus Busch purchased the bankrupt Belleville Glass Works and formed the Adolphus Busch Glass Company.  In 1891, a new plant was opened in Saint Louis near the Anheuser-Busch brewery at 3rd & Barton. The following year, 1892, the Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Company was organized.  The Belleville plant closed in 1894 due to a depression and did not reopen until 1899.  In 1900, a major fire destroyed the St. Louis works and the operations were shifted to the closed Frederick Heitz plant closer to the Anheuser- Busch brewery at Main & Dorcas Streets.  Another fire destroyed the plant at this location in 1905.  In this same year, the Belleville plant became part of the American Bottle Company.  Since the Saint Louis plant was in ruins at this time, it was not part of the new consolidation.  The Belgium Pavilion from the 1904 Worlds Fair in Saint Louis was purchased and reassembled as the new Saint Louis plant.  The Saint Louis plant was closed about 1926.  The markings are on the base of the bottles.  Notes
B. G. W. Bushwick Glass Works, (1864-1913),
Brooklyn, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Bushwick Glass Works mark Put bottles made by Bushwick Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This factory was started by James Brookfield, a seasoned glass man, and his son William Brookfield.  The family had recently moved from Honesdale, Pennsylvania where that had a glass factory.  William paid the tax on the factory in 1865 and 1866 and his name was associated with the works in later years.  In 1898, the Brookfield Glass company was organized and both it and the Bushwick Glass Works were advertised concurrently until 1913 in City Directories.  It is believed that the factory in Brooklyn was closed at this time and a plant in New Jersey operated until 1921.   The marking is on the base of the bottle.  Notes
CAMDEN GLASS WORKS Camden Glass Works, (approx: 1850-1852),
Camden, NJ, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Camden Glass Works mark Put bottles made by Camden Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  No information is currently available on this glass factory.  There was a Thomas Burns listed as a glass manufacturer in Camden in 1851, who is not currently associated with any factory.  The marking is on the reverse side of the bottle.
C G W Campbell Glass Works, (1884-1885),
West Berkeley, CA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Campbell mark Put bottles made by Campbell Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  John Campbell and J. H. Flickinger formed the Campbell Glass Works and started construction in late 1884.    It was incorporated as the Campbell Glass Manufacturing Company in 1885.  This plant closed in July of 1885.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
CANNINGTON SHAW & CO. MAKERS ST. HELENS ENGLAND C S & CO Cannington, Shaw & Company, (1875-1892),
Saint Helens, ENG, England, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cannington, Shaw & Company mark Put bottles made by Cannington, Shaw & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Edwin Cannington and John Shaw established this works in 1875 called the Sherdley Glass Works.  The company became a limited liability company in 1892.  This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913.  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
CANNINGTON SHAW & CO. LD MAKERS ST. HELENS ENGLAND Cannington, Shaw & Company Limited, (1892-1913),
Saint Helens, ENG, England, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cannington, Shaw & Company mark Put bottles made by Cannington, Shaw & Co. Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Edwin Cannington and John Shaw established this works in 1875 called the Sherdley Glass Works.  The company became a limited liability company in 1892.  This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913.  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
C. G. CO. Canton Glass Company, (1880-1899),
Canton, OH, United States, (1880-1894), Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Canton mark Put bottles made by Canton Glass Co. on a shelf
Marion, IN, United States, (1894-1899),
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company's focus was on the manufacture of tableware, but it also manufactured bottles and is famous for its blue "Canton Domestic Fruit Jar."  In 1894, the company moved to Marion, Indiana and later, in 1899, became part of the National Glass Syndicate. The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
A & D. H. C. Chambers, Alexander & David H., (1843-1888),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 279 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Alexander & David H. Chambers mark Put bottles made by Alexander & David H. Chambers on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  This firm was created with the dissolution of Chambers, Agnew & Company in 1843.  David Chambers died in 1862 and Alexander Chambers died in 1875, but the firm continued until about 1888.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle and rarely on the base.
Champion Stopper Mf'g Co 1 Greenfield, Mass. Champion Stopper Manufacturing Company, (approx: 1882-approx: 1885),
Greenfield, MA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Champion Stopper mark Put bottles made by Champion Stopper Manufacturing Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer and soda bottles.  This firm marketed Augustus Rich's bottle stopper, which was patented on January 10, 1882.  Since this closure never achieved any great level of success, the company must have been short lived.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
C. V. NO 1 MILW C 1 MILW C. V. CO NO 2 MILW C. V. NO 2 MILW C CO 2 MILW C V G CO MILW. Chase Valley Glass Company No. 1 (1880-1881),
Chase Valley Glass Company No. 2 (1880-1881),
Milwaukee, WI, United States, Occurs on 15 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Chase Valley mark Put bottles made by Chase Valley Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  Due to the demand for beer bottles in Milwaukee, Dr. Enoch Chase formed two glass manufacturing companies near his farm in Chase Valley.  Company one was fully owned by Dr. Chase and did not produce many soda or beer bottles.  Dr. Chase had a controlling interest in company number two, with a minority interest held by other local businessmen. This company produced the bulk of the soda and beer bottles.  Some bottles are not marked with the "No 1" or "No 2" designation and it is uncertain which of the two companies manufactured them.   The factories were built and commenced production in 1880 and were consolidated and reorganized in the summer of 1881 as the Wisconsin Glass Company.  Dr Enoch went on to be a state senator for the 1882-84 term.   The markings are typically on the base of the bottle.
C. B. & G. M. Co. C B G Co C Chattanooga Bottle & Glass Company,
Chattanooga, TN, United States (1901-1929), Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Chattanooga Bottle & Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by Chattanooga Bottle & Glass Co. on a shelf
Tallapoosa, GA, United States (1917-1926),
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  Charles Reif founded this company in 1901 to makes bottles for the brewery that his family owned and for other southern bottlers and medicine manufactures.  The initial products were green, amber and flint bottles and window glass.  The window glass segment of the business was soon dropped in the first year and the focus concentrated on supplying the Southern markets with bottles.  Early on they started to supply Coca-Cola bottlers with bottles and soda bottles became a specialty of the firm for years to come.  The company expanded in 1917 when it reopened the Tallapoosa Glass Company plant in Tallapoosa, GA, but closed the plant in 1926.  In the later years, milk bottles and vinegar bottles were listed as specialties. The company became the Chattanooga Glass Company in 1929 and continues to operate today as a division of Diamond Container General.  The markings are typically on the base of the bottle and occasionally on the heel.  Notes
CLYDE GLASS WORKS CLYDE N. Y. CLYDE C G W Clyde Glass Works, (1864-1880, 1895-1915),
Clyde, NY, United States, Occurs on 59 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Clyde mark Put bottles made by Clyde Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  A bottle bottle blowing factory was opened in by Southwick and Woods.  This factory was merged with a window glass factory, also in Clyde, under the name of Southwick, Reed & Company a short time later.  In 1880, the name of the plant became Ely, Son & Hoyt and in 1886, with the death of William Ely, the firm became Ely Sons & Hoyt.  (See E. S. & H.)  In 1895, the firm was incorporated as Clyde Glass Works.  The works stopped operation in 1915 and later efforts to reactivate it failed.  The markings appear on the base.
CODD'S PATENT 4 MAKERS CODD & RLYANDS BARNSLEY Codd & Rylands, (1881-1884),
Barnsley, England, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Codd & Rylands mark Put bottles made by Codd & Rylands on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This partnership was formed in 1877 between Ben Rylands and Hiram Codd.  Rylands owned the Hope Glass Works and Codd held the patent for a marble closure for soda bottles.  Ben Rylands died in 1881 and his son Dan joined the firm in his place.  At this time the name was changed to "Codd & Rylands."  The partnership with Codd dissolved in late 1884.  The Hope Glass Works used the mark of "4" on its glassware to signify it products attributes of accuracy, cleanliness, neatness and strength.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
H. Codd & Co. Codd, Hiram, & Company, (1880-1890),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 28 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the H. Codd & Co. mark Put bottles made by Codd & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Hiram Codd was awarded United States patents for his English Globe Stoppered bottles in 1872 and 1873. At the 1876 Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia, Codd won a medal for his patented bottles.  Seeing potential in the American market, between 1876 and 1880 Codd set up an American Agency to market licenses for his patented bottles at 22 Park Row in New York City.  Initially the bottles were manufactured at the "Patentee's own works at Barnsley."  Codd & Co. continued their English practice of licensing bottles by geographic region.  This was suppose to  limit the trafficking of the bottles as they were of no use to other bottlers.  The American licensed bottles have the licensed number embossed within a star and numbers between 1 and 95 are recorded.  Hiram Codd held license number 1 and that may explain the wide variety of these bottles.  He likely sold these to licensees for use while their private mold bottles were being manufactured and shipped from England.  Number 1 bottles have been found in numbers in Pensacola, Philadelphia, and other cities were Codd licenses were sold.  By 1886, Codd & Co. had moved to 22 Commerce St. and had shifted the manufacture of the bottles from England to Whitney Brothers glass factory at Glassboro, N. J.  The firm was still at 22 Commerce in 1890, but no references could be found after that date.  Codd's 1873 patent would have expired in 1890 and as Codd had died several years earlier, it seems likely the firm was dissolved soon after.  Notes
C. G. Co. Cohansey Glass Manufacturing Company, (1870-1911),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States (1870-1900), See Glass Factory
Downingtown, PA, United States(1900-1911), Occurs on 10 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cohansey mark Put bottles made by Cohansey Glass Manufacturing Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  Also know as the Cohansey Glass Company in later years.  This company was formed with the dissolution of  F. & J. Bodine in 1870.  During the 1890s it was beseeched with strikes and a major one at the Bridgeton plant in 1899 may have lead to its relocation from Bridgeton, New Jersey to Downingtown, Pennsylvania in 1900.  Records indicate the works were operating as late as 1906, but were closed by 1914. Most authors quote 1911 as the final date. The markings appear on the reverse heel oh the bottle and are usually followed by a number.
C. C. G. CO. COLO. C. G. CO. COLO. CITY G. CO. C. C. G. CO. Colorado City Glass Company, (1889-1893),
Colorado City, CO, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Colorado City mark Put bottles made by Colorado City Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  This factory was formed with capital from Adolphus Busch of Saint Louis and Jerome B. Wheeler of New York as principal share holders.  It consisted of a bottle and flint factory.  The factory sustained a major fire in 1892, but was rebuilt.  The silver panic of 1893 was partially responsible for its closure.  The markings usually appear on the base of the bottle, but in at least one instance on the heel.
COLO. G. W. COLO. G. W. CGW Colorado Glass Works, Colorado Glass Works Company, (1887-1888),
Golden, CO, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Colorado Glass mark Put bottles made by Colorado Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The name was changed from the Colorado Glass Works to the Colorado Glass Works Company after five months of operation.  A furnace collapse and labor dispute, brought the works to a halt in December of 1888.  The markings are normally on the base of the bottle and rarely on its heel. 
RICHD COOPER & CO LTD MAKERS PORTOBELLO SCOTLAND Cooper, Richard, & Company, Limited, (1895-aprox: 1928),
Portobello, Scotland, England, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cooper mark Put bottles made by Cooper, & Co., Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This glass works was founded in 1829 as a flint glass works by William Bailey.  In 1848, Bailey converted the works to green glass, which was more profitable.  In 1857, with the introduction of Richard Cooper, the firm became Bailey & Cooper.  With Bailey's death in 1859, Cooper's brother-in-law, Thomas Wood joined the firm as Cooper and Wood.  This partnership split in 1866, with each partner taking a part of the factory and running their own glass works.  The firm Richard Cooper & Company became a limited liability company in 1895.  These works were acquired by the Wood Bottle Company about 1928.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
C. G. Co. Coshocton Glass Company, (1902-1921), See Glass Factory
Coshocton, OH, United States, Occurs on 25 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Coshocton mark Put bottles made by Coshocton Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  In 1899, a Board of Trade was organized to attract new manufacturers to Coshocton.  The Board sold building lots to investors and used the proceeds to pay bonuses to attract manufacturers to the City.  Towards the end of 1901, the Board enticed the Saltsburg Glass Co., to open a plant in Coshocton with three acres of ground and a $15,000 bonus.  The deal was completed at the end of 1901 and building of the factory started soon after.  Saltsburg abandoned its facilities in Pennsylvania.  Production started in May of 1902 with an amber tank having 6 rings employing 50 men and boys including 18 blowers.  Beer bottlers were the main product.  The factory did not grow as expected, so in 1904, Thomas Gainor, who managed the Everett works in Newark and spent 7 years as a sales manager, was enticed to invest and manage the works.  Under Gainor, the works expanded greatly, a green glass ring was added and the amber ring expanded, and when he left two years later, the works employed 450.  Possibly due to a failure to secure financing to increase the Coshocton plant, a substantial offer from Everett, or knowledge of Everett's acquisition of Owens' blowing machines that would revolutionize the industry, Gainor returned to Everett and the Liewer brothers increased their share to become majority shareholders.  In 1908, a flint tank was added for prescription ware and liquor bottles, but it does not appear as this line was long-lasting and the focus returned to beverage bottles.  It appears that automatic bottle machines were in operation by 1915 and a new modern plant was built in 1916 in front of the old plant to meet the growing demand for beer, soda and Coca-Cola bottles. Waning demand for beer bottles caused by National Prohibition, a series of equipment failures, loss of key employees and poor quality product caused the cessation of operations in 1921.  The Liewer brothers sold the works to a group of local investors in 1923 and the new company was called the Coshocton Glass Corporation.  Although the plant was originally supposed to manufacture bottles, numerous delays in startup resulted in the plant producing glass tableware instead.  The works went into receivership in 1927 and attempts to sell the works were unsuccessful.  The property was liquidated in 1930.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottles.  Notes
C. C. G. Co. Cream City Glass Company, (1888-1893),
Milwaukee, WI, United States, Occurs on 18 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cream City mark Put bottles made by Cream City Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  In 1888, this company was organized to reopen the failed Wisconsin Glass Company factory, which had sat idle for five years.  The company prospered for some time with seven hundred employees in 1892, but the economic panic of 1893 closed its doors.  The markings are on the base of the bottles.
Cumberland mark Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Company, (1885-1920),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States, Occurs on 0 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cumberland mark Put bottles made by Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Co. on a shelf See Manufacture's Catalogue
Manufactured both soda and beer bottles.  Joseph A. Clark & Company were organized in August of 1880 and that same year built a factory on Water Street in Bridgeton.  The plant was also know as the Cumberland Glass Works.  The factory was soon moved to Laurel Street and in 1885, the company was reorganized as the Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Company.  This firm became the second largest glass works in New Jersey and was targeted by labor bosses for unionization, which it resisted until 1899.  Up until this settlement, there were an number of strikes and violent confrontations starting in the late 1880s.  The firm was an early adopter of semi-automated and automated bottle machines.  Cumberland purchased a number of its Bridgeton based competitors between 1902 and 1909.  Cumberland itself was purchased by the Illinois Glass company in April of 1920.   Although no bottles are known with a distinct Cumberland mark, a number of bottles have been identified with known mold number markings. The markings are on the base of the bottle. Notes
C & Co Cunningham & Company, (1857-1866),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham & Company mark Put bottles made by Cunningham & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured at least one marked soda bottle as well as numerous flasks and fruit jars. The company was the successor to W. Cunningham & Company in 1857 when Dominick Ihmsen joined the firm as a partner.  Marked bottles date from all years of operation.  The company was succeeded by Cunningham & Ihmsen.  The markings are usually on the front heel of the bottle.
C. & Co. 2 Cunningham & Company, (1878-1885),
Cunningham & Company, Inc., (1900-1907),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 54 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham & Company mark Put bottles made by Cunningham & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The company was organized in 1878 with the withdraw of Dominick Ihmsen from Cunningham & Ihmsen.  The company was made up of various Cunningham family members until it became Cunningham & Company, Limited in 1886.  In 1900, the limited was dropped and the firms was incorporated.  The same mark was used on these later bottles.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle and occasionally on the base.  The later marks are often followed with a number with 2, 3, and 4 known.
C. & CO. LIM. NO 5 Cunningham & Company Limited, (1886-1900),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 80 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham & Company mark Put bottles made by Cunningham & Co. Limited on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The company was organized out of Cunningham & Company in 1886.  The name Limited was dropped in 1900 when the company was incorporated.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle and are often followed by 2, NO 5, NO 7, 9.
C & I Cunningham & Ihmsen, (1866-1878),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 79 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham & Ihmsen mark Put bottles made by Cunningham & Ihmsen on a shelf
Manufactured both soda and beer bottles. The company was the successor to Cunningham & Company in 1866.  Marked bottles date from all years of operation.  The company was succeeded by Cunningham & Company, with the retirement of Dominick Ihmsen in 1878.  The markings are usually on the reverse heel of the bottle, but occasionally appear on the bottle's base.  
D. O. C. Cunningham, Domenic O'Connor, (1882-1897),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 193 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham mark Put bottles made by Cunningham on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  When Domenic O'Connor Cunningham inherited money he formed his own glass manufacturing company.  Previously, he had been a member of Cunningham & Company. D. O. Cunningham incorporated in 1897.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
D. C. CO. I. Cunningham, Dominic, Company Inc., (1897-1931),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Cunningham mark Put bottles made by Dominic Cunningham Co. Inc. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Domenic O'Connor Cunningham incorporated in 1897.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
D. G. Co. D. Glass Company, (approx: 1895-approx: 1900),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the D. G. Co. mark Put bottles made by D. G. Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  This company is currently unidentified.  Numbers of bottles marked as such were found the Mid-Atlantic Costal States.  The markings are on the base of the bottle. The Dixie Glass Company and Duquesne Glass Company used similar marks.
EXTRA STRONG GLASS DALE BROWN & CO Ld TRADE MARK SWINTON ENGLAND Dale, Brown, & Company, Limited, (1913-1988),
Swinton, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dale Brown & Co. mark Put bottles made by Dale, Brown, & Co., Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was still hand blowing glass in 1928.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
D S G Co. De Steiger Glass Company (1878-approx: 1896),
Buffalo, IA, United States (1880-approx:1882), 
La Salle, IL, United States (1878-approx: 1896), Occurs on 13 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the De Steiger Glass Company mark Put bottles made by De Steiger Glass Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  The history of this works is complex and incomplete.  Francis Stiger and his wife Elizabeth resided in Peru Iowa, where he was a miner as early as 1845.  Some time between 1860 and 1870, Francis died and the widow Elizabeth took her children to Saint Louis.  The oldest son Philip was listed as a painter in 1870.  In 1878 Elizabeth (now De Steiger) moved with her children Philip (32), Mary (29), Joseph (20) and Edward (18) to La Salle, Illinois.  Philip must have been the driver behind the creation of the De Steiger Glass Company in 1878, as he was listed as a glass manufacturer in 1880 and president of the company in 1882.  The company had capital of $50,000, purchased the old window glass works and built modern bottle factories as well.  How this widow and her children went from meager means to founding a large glass works is a mystery that needs to be researched.  A second plant in Buffalo, Iowa was acquired about 1880 and remained in business for several years.  Seeing a market for "German turn mold bottles" (a practice of placing straw or wood shavings in the mold and turning the bottle as it was being blown to remove the mold seams and polish the bottle), De Steiger discharged the existing glass workers during the summer of 1880 and a new crew of German workers were imported.  Many of their fired workers went to Streator and the influx of bottle blowers may have been the impetus that sparked the Streator Bottle & Glass Company to be organized in 1881. The De Steiger plants used Sieman's continuous tanks which were in use in Europe, but not in America.  Discharging its workers, importing lesser paid foreigners, and using new technology that allowed bottles to be blown 24 hours a day caused problems with the Bottle Blowers' League, an early union.  In the midst of this, the business was running into financial difficulties and ended up in litigation which resulted in a sheriff's sale in 1883.  It was noted that some workers went to Streator in that year as well.  The Bank of Peru appears to have been the purchaser.  Later that year, a devastating fire destroyed both factories.  The factories were rebuilt in early 1884, but appear to have been idle later that year and were idle in 1886 and noted as to have gone through several owners.  The works appeared to have reopened sometime before 1890 and there were advertisements until 1896 in the National Bottlers Gazette.   The markings appear on the base of the bottle. Notes
DEAN FOSTER & CO. MADE BY C13 BOSTON Dean, Foster & Company, (1874-approx: 1909),
Boston, MA, United States, Occurs on 51 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dean Foster & Company mark Put bottles made by Dean, Foster & Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  George Foster had established the New Granite Glass Works in 1861 and moved to Boston in 1862 to establish a glass ware house initially at 106 State Street and later was a agent at 14 Blackstone.  The E. A. Buck & Company, of 14 Blackstone Street, operated the Westford Glass Works and failed in 1873. Charles S. Dean, who was partner and Elmer G. Foster, a clerk at the same address, formed Dean, Foster & Company and briefly operated a glass works in Westford, but also purchased wares from the Dorfling Glass Company in White Mills, Pennsylvania.  In 1875, the firm consisted of C. L. Dean, E. G. Foster, and A. G. Smalley.  This company originally specialized in druggists' ware, but later branched into beer bottles.  In 1883 a Chicago branch was established with Arthur Dawley, an employee since 1876, and the firm was Dean, Foster & Dawley.  Dawley sold his interest back to his partners in 1889 and in 1893, the Chicago branch became A. M. Foster & Company. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
D. F. & D. Dean, Foster & Dawley, (1883-1889),
Chicago, IL, United States, Occurs on 7 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dean Foster & Dawley mark Put bottles made by Dean, Foster & Dawley on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  Charles S. Dean, who was partner and Elmer G. Foster formed Dean, Foster & Company and briefly operated a glass works in Westford.  This company originally specialized in druggists' ware, but later branched into beer bottles.  In 1883 a Chicago branch was established with Arthur Dawley, an employee since 1876, and the firm was Dean, Foster & Dawley.  Dawley sold his interest back to his partners in 1889.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
Diamond mark Diamond Glass Company, (1886-1985),
Royersford, PA, United States, Occurs on 47 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Diamond mark Put bottles made by Diamond Glass Co. on a shelf See Manufacture's Catalogue
Manufactured both soda and beer bottles.  In 1886 a group of investors purchased the Penn Glass Works in Royersford and renamed it the Diamond Glass Company.  Most marked bottles date 1886 to 1890 and have smooth bases.  The company became purchased in 1985 to become part of Diamond-Bathurst in 1985.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
Dixie mark Dixie Glass Company (Works), (1897-1907),
Tallapoosa, GA, United States, Occurs on 14 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dixie mark Put bottles made by Dixie Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Dixie Glass "Company" is recorded to have opened on a cooperative basis in 1897 operating at the old Piedmont Glass factory.  The Tallapoosa area was a center for wine making and the wineries need glass bottles to package their wares.  The company appears to have  been reorganized in 1900, as the Dixie Glass "Works" and Charles H. Pancoast, formerly manager at Augusta and Atlanta glass works, was president of the company. In 1902, the plant was expanded with a continuous tank and E. P. C. Fowler, a local bottler and ice dealer, was president the works.  By 1905, George W. Sheppard, the local bank president was running the operation. In 1906 the works were expanded again and perhaps the works could not sustain the expense, because they were bankrupt in February of 1907.  In July 1907, the works were purchased by George M. Greely for $14,100 and the Tallapoosa Glass Manufacturing Co. was organized to operate the facilities.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
J. W. DOBSON MAKER BARNSLEY Dobson, John W., (approx: 1882-approx: 1898),
Barnsley, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dobson mark Put bottles made by Dobson on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1872 Sutcliff and Wade started the Oaks Glass Bottle Works in Barnsley.  In 1877 Dobson joined the partnership.  One year later the firm was known as Wade & Dobson and continued until at least 1879.  By 1884, Dobson alone was the proprietor of the Oaks Glass Bottle Works.  By 1899, it had become a limited liability company and by 1903, it was known as Dobson & Nail, Limited.  Dobson & Nail also manufactured bottle cases and some bottles are marked as such a way.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
DOBSON & NALL LTD. BOTTLE & CASE MAKERS BARNSLEY Dobson & Nail. Limited, (approx: 1903-1955),
Barnsley, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dobson & Nail mark Put bottles made by Dobson & Nail on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1872 Sutcliff and Wade started the Oaks Glass Bottle Works in Barnsley.  In 1877 Dobson joined the partnership.  One year later the firm was known as Wade & Dobson and continued until at least 1879.  By 1884, Dobson alone was the proprietor of the Oaks Glass Bottle Works.  By 1899, it had become a limited liability company and by 1903, it was known as Dobson & Nail, Limited.  Dobson & Nail also manufactured bottle cases and some bottles are marked as such a way.  The company was dissolved in 1955.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
D. G. Co. Duquesne Glass Company, (1905-1917),
Paden City, WV, United States, Occurs on 18 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Duquesne Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by Duquesne Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  This company was incorporated on November 9, 1905.  That same year another company named the Duquesne Glass Company was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to manufacture insulators.  These two companies were in no way related.  The Paden City firm was also incorporated by Pittsburgh men and the driving force in its creation was August J. Rittman, an experienced factory manager who worked at the Poughkeepsie Glass Works, the Colonial Glass Company in Kingston, New York and before founding Duquesne, at the Cunningham & Co. factory in Pittsburgh.  Like Cunningham & Co., the initial specialty was soda and beer bottles. Rittman left to work at the Coshocton Glass Company about 1907.  The factory did well until about 1912, but then the business tapered off and the focus was shifted to medicine bottles.  Eventually the plant went idle.  In August of 1917, the works were acquired by the American Glass Works of Richmond, Virginia and the output was primarily extract bottles for the Sauer Company.  The plant is reported to have remained open until 1935.  The marks are on the reverse heel of the bottles and are very similar to the Cunningham marks, likely a practice copied by Rittman from his time at Cunningham & Co., with the initials followed by a mold number.  Notes
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS PHILADA Dyottville Glass Works, (1847-approx: 1888),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 117 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Dyottville mark Put bottles made by Dyottville Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured both soda and beer bottles.  Most marked bottles date 1850 to 1858 and bear improved pontils.  The markings are usually on the reverse of the bottle, but occasionally occur either on the bottle's shoulder or  base.
E. G. W. E. Glass Works, (approx: 1895-approx: 1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the E. Glass Works mark Put bottles made by E. Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Appears on a Hutchinson bottle from the North Western Pennsylvania town of Ridgway and may be from a period glass works mentioned in nearby Brockwayville.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
EAGLE WORKS PHILADA Eagle Glass Works, (1847-1849),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Eagle mark Put bottles made by Eagle Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This works was first advertised in 1848, but is believed to have started earlier.  It continued to be listed in 1849 in various directories and on a map.  By 1850, there was no trace of this company.  The one marked bottle is embossed "Eagle Works" and appears on the lower part of the bottle.
W. EAGKES MAKERS MANCHESTER Eagles, W., (approx: 1890-approx: 1910),
Manchester, England, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Eagles mark Put bottles made by Eagles on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  No information was found for this firm.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
E . L 6 East Lake Glass Works, (1883-1904),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States, Occurs on 23 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the East Lake mark Put bottles made by East Lake Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  These works were opened in the later part of 1883 under the proprietorship of Dr. John B. Bowen and Joseph C. Kirby.  Dr. Bowen was the brother-in-law of Kirby, who was a successful dentist.  The works employed about 80 men and boys and were located on Manheim Avenue near East Commerce.  David McBride, a successful farmer, merchant and ex-sheriff, bought out Bowen soon after and the firm was known as Kirby & McBride by 1885. McBride died in 1894 and his wife continued to function as partner until February of 1904, when they works were sold to I Whelden Moore.  The markings are on the base of the bottle and and are known with numbers 4, 5, 6, 7,  8 and 9.  Notes
E G Co. Eastern Glass Company, (1909-1913),
Cumberland, MD, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Eastern Glass mark Put bottles made by Eastern Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The company reopened the Queen City Glass Company works on Queen & Railroad Street.  The firm continued to manufacture flint glass and focused on homeopathic vials.  The factory burned in 1913 and does not appear to have been reopened.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
ELLENVILLE GLASS WORKS Ellenville Glass Works, (1862-1896),
Ellenville, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ellenville mark Put bottles made by Ellenville Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This works was founded in 1836 by a group of men from the Willington Glass Company in Connecticut.  Initially it was named the Ellenville Glass Company and retained this name, according to sources, until after the Civil War, when in 1866, the name became the Ellenville Glass Works.  However, there were "Glass Works" bottles recovered from a shipwreck that occurred in 1864.  It is thus more likely the name changed between 1862 and 1864 from "Company" to "Works."  After a failure, the works were sold to Charles A. Edwards and the company became the Ellenville Glass Factory.  However, it is still referred to by contemporary sources as the "Ellenville Glass Works."  This name was retained until its closing in 1896.  The markings are on the base of the bottle. 
ELY SON & HOYT CLYDE N. Y. E. S. & H. CLYDE N. Y. Ely Son & Hoyt, (1880-1886),
Ely Sons & Hoyt, (1886-1895),
Clyde, NY, United States, Occurs on 16 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ely Son & Hoyt mark Put bottles made by Ely Son & Hoyt on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  A bottle bottle blowing factory was opened in by Southwick and Woods.  This factory was merged with a window glass factory, also in Clyde, under the name of Southwick, Reed & Company a short time later.  In 1880, the name of the plant became Ely, Son & Hoyt and in 1886, with the death of William Ely, the firm became Ely Sons & Hoyt.  In 1895, the firm was incorporated as Clyde Glass Works.  (See Clyde Glass Works.)  The works stopped operation in 1915 and later efforts to reactivate it failed.  The markings appear on the base.
ERIE Erie Glass Company Limited, (1892-1893+),
Port Colborne, ON, Canada, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Erie mark Put bottles made by Erie on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Natural gas discoveries near Port Colborne were the impetus for attracting industries to the area.  Starting in 1891, negotiations were under way to build a glass factory there.  The Erie Glass Company, operated out of Toronto, started operation in Port Colborne in 1892.  A wide range of products, included fruit jars, soda, medicine, and mucilage bottles were manufactured.  Both green and flint wares were produced.  The factory burned in February 1893 and it is not known if it was rebuilt.  What is know is that in 1894, the Erie Glass Company was in liquidation and there were no listings in the 1895 Port Colborne directory.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
E. H. E. 33 Everett, Edward H., (1880-1885),
Newark, OH, United States, Occurs on 27 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Everett mark Put bottles made by Everett on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  Everett purchased the Newark Star Glass Works in 1880.  Everett incorporated his Company in 1885.  In 1904, Everett merged his factory with those in Massillon and Wooster into the $4 million Ohio Bottle Company. The following year this company sold some of its land to Everett's newly incorporated Newark Machine Bottle Company, which would install the Owens Automatic machines. In August 1905, the Ohio Bottle and Newark Machine Bottle Companies merged with others to become the American Bottle Company with $10 million in capital. The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Often there is a number following the marking.
E. H. E. CO. Everett, Edward H., & Company, (1885-1904),
Newark, OH, United States, Occurs on 192 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Everett mark Put bottles made by Everett & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  Everett purchased the Newark Star Glass Works in 1880.  Everett incorporated his Company in 1885.  In 1904, Everett merged his factory with those in Massillon and Wooster into the $4 million Ohio Bottle Company. The following year this company sold some of its land to Everett's newly incorporated Newark Machine Bottle Company, which would install the Owens Automatic machines. In August 1905, the Ohio Bottle and Newark Machine Bottle Companies merged with others to become the American Bottle Company with $10 million in capital. The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
FACILE Facile Bottle Stopple Company, (1887-1889),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Facile mark Put bottles made by Facile Bottle Stopple Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  This company marketed George Fullerton's bottle stopper and was assigned a third of the 1888 patent.  Fullerton's 1887 patent was partially assigned to William F. Duncan of New York City and it is likely he was involved in organizing this company.  The company had a claim in 1889 that was unsettled in 1895 and since Duncan is not identified with this company in 1890, it seems it went out of business during 1889.  The marking is on the base of the bottle.
F. A. & CO. Fahnestock, Albree & Company, (approx: 1860-1871),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 16 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Fahnestock, Albree & Company mark Put bottles made by Fahnestock, Albree & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles. The firm consisted of Robert C. Albree and B. L. Fahnestock.  This firm was organized in 1860 and remain in effect until 1871.  The markings are usually on the front heel of the bottle. 
F. B. C. Fairmont Bottle Company, (1906-approx: 1914),
Fairmont, WV, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Fairmont mark Put bottles made by Fairmont Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This glass factory was first chartered on October 24, 1906 and replace the firm of Johns Brothers.  The initial incorporators were James O. Watson,  J. C. Hall, John O. Morgan, C. H. Jenkins, and Thos. F. Robey, all of Fairmont, West Virginia. This plant also manufactured milk bottles.  The last found reference was in 1913. The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
F. B. & F. J. CO. 9 Fairmont Bottle & Fruit Jar Company, (1892-1893),
Fairmont, WV, United States, Occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Fairmont mark Put bottles made by Fairmont Bottle & Fruit Jar Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This glass factory was first chartered on April 26, 1892.  The initial incorporators were E. J. Bebee, Robert Johns, Jonathan R. Johns, Jonathan E. Beebe, all of Finlay, Ohio and Abram Kesley of Martins Creek, Pennsylvania.   They were attracted to Fairmont by the low cost of natural gas offered to glass manufactures.  By 1911, five glass works operated there. The company was purported to have dissolved the following year and reorganized into Johns Brothers.  However, It was still operating as late as September, 1893.  Still later, the firm was known as the Fairmont Bottle Company.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
F. G. W. Fairmount Glass Works, (1897-1945),
Fairmount, IN, United States, (1898-1906), Occurs on 12 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Fairmount mark Put bottles made by Fairmount Glass Works on a shelf
Indianapolis, IN, United States, (1904-1945), 
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Fairmount Glass Company was founded in 1889 by John Rau, a practical glass man, W. C. Winslow, a banker, and a third party.  On Winslow's death in 1894, his son Palmer Winslow became president of the firm.  Palmer Winslow sold his interest to John Rau in 1897 or 1898.  Winslow went on to establish a new works at Matthews, Indiana and John Rau renamed the factory the Fairmount Glass Works. Possibly because of the lack of a reliable source of fuel, in 1904, a new factory was built in Indianapolis and eventually all operations shifted to this location.  The company was incorporated in 1945 as the Fairmount Glass Works, Inc., in 1960 became the Fairmount Glass Corp., in 1964 Fairmount Glass Co., and in 1968 it became a subsidiary of the the Glass Containers, Inc.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
F. C. G. CO. Falls City Glass Company, (1884-1892),
Louisville, KY, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Falls City mark Put bottles made by Falls City Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  This glass factory was first listed in 1884 and last appears on a 1892 insurance map.  It was located on Lytle Street between 26th and 27th in the Portland section of Louisville.  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
F. B. Co. Findlay Bottle Company, (1888-1893),
Findley, OH, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Findlay mark Put bottles made by Findlay Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Findlay bottle company was organized in 1888 to take advantage of cheap natural gas that was found in and around Findlay, Ohio.  It was one of many glassworks that opened there in the closing years of the 1880s who were enticed with five year contracts with marginal gas rates.  Green glass bottles and fruit jars were its specialty.  The company employed about 125 workers and operated eight pots.  The demand of all the factories stressed the gas supply and factories were limited to only use gas in the furnaces and to use oil for auxiliary operations like annealing ovens.  An inspection in the spring of 1893 found Findlay in violation of the this regulation and they were required to pay the highest rates. The went into receivership soon after and never recovered.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
FLUGEL & CO. LONDON F. & CO. LONDON Flugel & Company, (approx: 1890-approx: 1950),
London, ENG, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Flugel mark Put bottles made by Flugel & Co. on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  Flugel & Company appear to be suppliers to the soda water trade and most likely were jobbers for the bottles that bear their mark.  The markings appear on the reverse heel and the base of bottles.
Foster Brothers Foster Brothers, (approx: 1855-approx: 1874),
Saint Johns, QU, Canada, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Foster Brothers mark Put bottles made by Foster Brothers on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This works traces its origin to the Champlain  Glass Company, a window glass works, which moved its operations from Burlington, Vermont to St. Johns, Canada East (Quebec) in 1846.  This enterprise was a failure, but this window glass works appears to have continued as the Canada Glass Works until 1854, when it was purchased by Joseph Foster and retooled as a bottle factory.  This firm produced bottles and insulators, one of which is dated 1858. The exact end of the Foster Brothers tenure is not certain, but it clearly occurred by 1875, when James Macpherson organized the St. John Glass Company, which went bankrupt in 1878.  The Yuile Brothers purchased the works and were operating the factory in 1879 as the Excelsior Glass Company.  They moved the factory to Montreal in 1880.  Through a series of name changes and acquisitions it became the Dominion Glass Company.   The markings are on the face of the bottle.  Notes
W. F. Frank, William, (1866-1869),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Frank mark Put bottles made by Frank on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  William Frank immigrated from Germany to the United States in 1840 and at some point lived in Ohio.  In 1846, he came to Pittsburgh, became a naturalized citizen and ran a dry goods business. He was introduced to the glass business by his brother-in-law Ephraim Wormser. In 1858, the pair purchased some land four miles east of downtown Pittsburgh and built a glass factory.  The firm name was E. Wormser & Company.  Frank continued to operate the dry goods business as W. Frank & Co. until 1861. In March of  1866, William Frank gained full control of the business.  Wormser turned his attention to an oil business founded a year earlier, in which Frank was also an investor.  In 1870, the firm became W. Frank & Son. The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.  Notes
W. F. & S. Frank, William, & Sons, (1870-1876),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Frank mark Put bottles made by Frank & Sons on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Previous sources indicated that this firm was established in 1866, but this is not supported by directory listings, marked bottles, some of which bear William Frank's initials alone, and the fact that his sons would have been too young (20 & 18 years old) to have been partners in 1866. In 1870, Hiram and Samuel joined their father as W. Frank & Sons.  This is the first year this firm appears in the directories. Later Abraham joined his brothers and father. The factory burned in 1874 and was rebuilt. 1876 is the last year the Frankstown Glass Works. This same listing has them also operating as auctioneers and the firm of W. Frank & Sons continued to operate the dry goods business until 1880, when William retired.  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.  Notes
W. F. & S. MIL
Franzen mark
Franzen, William, & Son, Milwaukee, (1901-1926),
Milwaukee, WI, United States, Occurs on 35 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Franzen mark Put bottles made by Franzen & Son on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  William Frazen took over the financially failing Northern Glass Company in 1896.  The company put a focus on producing beer bottles for Milwaukee's brewers and this would eventually lead to its downfall.  Frazen incorporated the works as William Frazen & Son in 1901 and became Wisconsin's most successful glass manufacturer.  However, when Prohibition fell in 1919, the need for beer bottles dried up.  The Board of Directors voted to scale back operations in 1921 and the plant was closed in 1926.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle and occasionally on the heel.
G. & CO. G. & Company, (approx: 1895-1905),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the G. & Company mark Put bottles made by G. & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Appears on at least one Hutchinson shaped soda bottle from the Midwest.  Could be an error for "C. & Co."  The markings appear on the reverse side on the heel of the bottle.
GGW Gayner Glass Works, (1898-1956),
Salem, NJ, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Gaynor Glass Works mark Put bottles made by Gaynor Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured mineral water bottles.  John Gayner was born in England and learned the trade from his father while growing up there.  He came to the United States with his wife and four children.  After several failed attempts both in England and the United States, he succeeded in Salem.  The firm name of the Gayner Glass Works was adopted in 1898. The works specialized in large wares and specialty items and continued to have hand blown operations, in addition to automated blowing machines, well after hand blowing shops were closed at other works. The business was sold to Star City Glass Company in 1956, but the Gayner name continued to be used for the Salem plant until 1975 when it was closed.  It was briefly reopened in 1977, but closed permanently in 1979. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
G Glenshaw Glass Company, (1895-2007),
Glenshaw, PA, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Glenshaw mark Put bottles made by the Glenshaw Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Glenshaw Glass Company was started in 1895 by a group of Pittsburgh glass blowers.  One of it specialties was the manufacture of siphon bottles.  The company became Kelman Bottles LLC in 2008.  Notes
GREENBANK GLASS WORKS Greenbank Glass Works, (approx: 1840-1850, 1857-1858),
Green Bank, NJ, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Green Banks mark Put bottles made by Greenbank Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  William Coffin Sr. established this glass house in about 1840.  Coffin died in 1844 and John H. Coffin took over management of the works.  He closed the works in 1850.  It was reopened in 1857 and operated for one year as a cooperative by a group of glassblowers and was permanently closed in 1858 on their failure.  The markings appear on the reverse side of the bottle.
H. & F. H. & F., (approx: 1880-approx: 1895),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 6 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the H. & F. mark Put bottles made by H. & F. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  The mark appears on the base of champagne beer  bottles mainly from Northeast Pennsylvania, Northern New Jersey, New York City and Long Island.  It may be from a glass jobber in the New York City area.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
W. S. H. H., W. S., (approx: 1890-approx: 1905),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 7 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the W. S. H. mark Put bottles made by W. S. H. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The mark appears on the base of Hutchinson bottles mainly from Lehigh Valley and surrounding areas of Pennsylvania.  It may be from a glass works in that area.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
Made By H. B. & Co. Hagerty Brothers & Company, (approx: 1869-1953),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hagerty mark Put bottles made by Hagerty Brothers & Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  They were glass jobbers.  The business started as Hagerty & Lear (Bernard B. Hagerty & Harry Lear), who were suppliers of druggists glassware and were in business as early as 1851 and possibly 1849, the date claimed in later advertisements.  The firm became B. B. & J Hagerty by 1857 and remain so to at least 1862.  They were located at 8 & 10 Platt Street in New York City and remained at this address for the next 70 plus years.  By 1867 the firm became Hagerty Brothers and remained so until 1869 when it became Hagerty Brothers & Company, which it retained until 1953 when the business closed.  For many years they represented the Haggerty Glass Works.  This factory on Smith Street was known as the Hamilton Glass Works in 1851.  By 1868, it was known as the Brooklyn Green Glass Works operated by a partnership between B. B. Hagerty, Wm. W. Gardiner and Wm. Burrows with Hagerty Brothers as agents.  Later the works, now called the Hagerty Glass Works, were under the control of B. B. Hagerty & Co. with Hagerty Bros. & Co. as agents.  By 1888, Annie J., Bernard's wife, was in control of the works  as A. J. Hagerty & Co. and remained so until at least 1896 and Hagerty Bros & Co. were agents.  The works were still in operation in 1900, but were closed by 1904.   The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
HAGERTY GLASS WORKS N. Y. Hagerty Glass Works, (approx: 1870-approx: 1902),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hagerty mark Put bottles made by Hagerty Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  These works were located in Brooklyn.  There were two distinct businesses associated with this glass factory at 531 Smith Street between 9th Street and Hamilton Avenue.  The older business started as Hagerty & Lear (Bernard B. Hagerty & Harry Lear), who were suppliers of druggists glassware and were in business as early as 1851 and possibly 1849, the date claimed in later advertisements.  The firm became B. B. & J Hagerty by 1857 and remain so to at least 1862.  They were located at 8 & 10 Platt Street in New York City and remained at this address for the next 70 plus years.  By 1867 the firm became Hagerty Brothers and remained so until 1869 when it became Hagerty Brothers & Company, which it retained until 1953 when the business closed.  The factory on Smith Street was known as the Hamilton Glass Works in 1851.  By 1868, it was known as the Brooklyn Green Glass Works operated by a partnership between B. B. Hagerty, Wm. W. Gardiner and Wm. Burrows with Hagerty Brothers as agents.  Later the works, now called the Hagerty Glass Works, were under the control of B. B. Hagerty & Co. with Hagerty Bros. & Co. as agents.  By 1888, Annie J., Bernard's wife, was in control of the works  as A. J. Hagerty & Co. and remained so until at least 1896 and Hagerty Bros & Co. were agents.  The works were still in operation in 1900, but were closed by 1904.   The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
GLASS WORKS HAMILTON Hamilton Glass Works, (1864-1891),
Hamilton, ON, Canada, Occurs on 7 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hamilton mark Put bottles made by Hamilton Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  According to the Hamilton Spectator, this factory started operation on September 12, 1864 and was owned by Gatchell, Moore & Company.  The works were located on James Street North and there were about 50 employees half of which were glass blowers.  The production was to consist of small bottles.  In 1872, George Rutherford & Company took over the works and retained ownership until 1891, when the works were sold to the Diamond Glass Co., which closed the plant in 1898.  The plant was refurbished and Diamond installed Owens Automatic bottle machines in this plant in 1906 and operated it as their Hamilton Plant until 1913, when it was sold to the Dominion Glass Company Limited.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
HAMILTON GLASS WORKS N. Y. Hamilton Glass Works, (1851-1854),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hamilton mark Put bottles made by Hamilton Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This works was located on the corner of Hamilton Avenue and Smith Street in Brooklyn.  The works were advertised on September 12, 1851 in an Albany newspaper right above a notice for the sale of the Albany Glass works.  Daniel O. Ketchum & Company were listed as the proprietors.  Ketchum had been the agent for the Albany Glass Works prior to its closing in 1851.  The last listing for Ketchum & Company was in the 1854 New York Directory. In later years the works became the Brooklyn Green Glass Works and still later the Hagerty Glass Works.  By 1859, Ketchum was in the oil business at Smith near Hamilton.  The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.  Notes
H (in triangle) Hamilton, James T & Albert, (1879-1943),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 4 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the J. T. & A. Hamilton mark Put bottles made by J. T. & A. Hamilton on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  James T. and Albert were associated with the W. H. Hamilton glass works until 1879, when they established their own glass works at 26th and Railroad Streets.  Their specialty was flint glass bottles, which included beer, whiskey, and milk bottles in addition to prescription wares.  In 1887 a plant was established at Butler and in 1902 a third plant was opened at Blairsville.  Albert was murdered in 1902 and James continued the works incorporating on December 11, 1916.  The milk bottle business was to be sold to Thatcher in 1920, but Hamilton was advertising machine made milk bottles in 1922 and in later years before the business was sold to Knox in 1943.  At this time the factory was renamed the Seaboard Glass Bottle Co.  The makers mark was filed in 1912 and was issued a trade Marked in 1915.  The application claimed it to be in use in 1900. The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
HH Hastings & Hahn, (1877-1892),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hastings & Hahn mark Put bottles made by Hastings & Hahn on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  Andrew K. Hastings and Philip J. Hahn formed the company of Hastings & Hahn in 1877.  the company was located at various addresses on Murray street over the years.  They were glass jobbers, but advertised as manufactures in trade magazines. However there is no evidence that they every manufactured glass.  Hastings retired from the firm in 1892 and the firm was succeeded by Philip J. Hahn & Son.  The markings appear on base of the bottle.  Notes
H. G. Co. Hawley Glass Company, (1885-1942),
Hawley, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hawley mark Put bottles made by Hawley Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1882, the Hawley Glass Company Limited was built on Crystal Street in Hawley along with several company houses, which were rented to the factory�s workers.  The initial workers were strikers from the Honesdale Glass Works and William F. Dorflinger was their agent.  It was incorporated in 1885 as the Hawley Glass Company.  The factory may have closed in 1887 due to labor troubles.  It is possible that the factory was reopened between 1902 and 1906 as the Harloe Insulator Company.  The Hawley Glass Company was listed in a 1928 phone book and a 1936 Directory.  The factory and surrounding buildings were destroyed by a flood in 1942.  The markings appear on base of the bottle.
HAWLEY GLASS CO. LIMITED 2 MFR'S Hawley Glass Company Limited, (1882-1885),
Hawley, PA, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hawley mark Put bottles made by Hawley Glass Co. Limited on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1882, the Hawley Glass Company Limited was built on Crystal Street in Hawley along with several company houses, which were rented to the factory�s workers.  The initial workers were strikers from the Honesdale Glass Works and William F. Dorflinger was their agent.  It was incorporated in 1885 as the Hawley Glass Company.  The factory may have closed in 1887 due to labor troubles.  It is possible that the factory was reopened between 1902 and 1906 as the Harloe Insulator Company.  The Hawley Glass Company was listed in a 1928 phone book and a 1936 Directory.  The factory and surrounding buildings were destroyed by a flood in 1942.  The markings appear on base of the bottle.
F. H. G. W. Heitz, Frederick Glass Works, (1882-1897),
Saint Louis, MO, United States, Occurs on 11 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Heitz mark Put bottles made by Frederick Heitz Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Frederick Heitz came to the United States from Germany in 1860 and eventually settled in Saint Louis where he was a grocer and operated a saloon.  In a mystery yet to be unraveled, he ended up the operator of a glass works at the Northwest corner of Main & Dorcas Streets in 1883.  This location was unoccupied according to a 1875 map so the factory must have been newly built.  This property was extremely close to the Anheuser-Busch brewery and it is believed that most of the production went to that enterprise.  Heitz is last listed in 1897 as a glass maker and returned to the grocery business.  He is not listed in the 1910 Census.  During 1900, the Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Company had control of the works and was producing beer bottles for the Anheuser-Busch Brewery.   The markings appear on the base of bottles.  Notes
H. G. CO. Hemingray Glass Company, (1882-1933),
Covington, KY, United States, (1882-1890), Occurs on 18 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hemingray mark Put bottles made by Hemingray Glass Co. on a shelf
Muncie, IN, United States, (1888-1933),
Manufactured soda bottles.  Hemingray started as Gray and Hemingray in 1848 and was listed listed in the 1850 federal Industrial Census. The original plant was located in Cincinnati, Ohio, but in 1851 was moved to Covington, Kentucky.  In 1864, Gray left the firm and it became Hemingray Brothers & Company.  The company was widely known for its early production of insulators and fruit jars, although it is attributed for the manufacture of many of the early blue soda bottles from Cincinnati.  In 1882, The Hemingray Glass Company was organized.  In 1888, the company established a plant in Muncie, Indiana and phased out the Covington Works.  The Company was acquired by Owens-Illinois Glass Company in 1933.  The markings appear on the base of bottles.
327 H Holt Glass Works, (1893-1906),
West Berkeley, CA, United States, Occurs on 18 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Holt mark Put bottles made by Holt Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This factory was built on the site of the ill-fated Campbell Glass Works.  The initial company operated for three years until it ended it went bankrupt.  It reopened under new management and was growing, when it was destroyed by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.  The markings are on the base of the bottle, usually preceded by a number in the 300-399 range, and made in a four part mold.
HONESDALE GLASS WORKS PA Honesdale Glass Works, (1847-1861),
Honesdale, PA, United States, Occurs on 13 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Honesdale mark Put bottles made by Honesdale Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  A window glass plant, called the Bethany Glass Works, was established in Bethany, which is northwest of Honesdale, in 1818 by Christopher Faatz and several others.  The works eventually failed and was reopened by Jacob Faatz in 1829.  He operated the factory until 1839, when it failed as well.  On June 4, 1847, Jacob Faatz broke ground for a new glass works at the mouth of Carley Brook east of Honesdale at Traceyville, now known as East Honesdale.  Soon after, it was taken over by Henry Dark and James Dickson, who failed when they shipped a large order of window glass overland to California.   The works were briefly owned by by R. F. Lord and T. H. R. Tracey who sold the works to James Brookfield in 1849 .  Brookfield and E. V. White patented an anthracite fired glass furnace and installed it in their factory in 1851.  As a result, at one point this factory was named the Anthracite Glass Company.   In 1861, due to a flooding storm, a dam to one of the feeder ponds for the Delaware & Hudson Canal gave way and the water rushed down Carley Brook destroying the glass factory.  Brookfield moved his glass making operation to Brooklyn, New York and became a celebrated manufacturer of insulators.  In 1872, the works were restored and incorporated  by Christian Dorflinger, W.W. Weston, C. S. Minor, Wm. Weiss, W. H. Ham, and J. A. Terrel.  Dorflinger had established a glass factory in White Mills, about six miles south of Honesdale, in 1865 to manufacture fancy cut glass ware.  The Honesdale Glass Works were incorporated in 1887 and became the Honesdale Glass Company in 1897.  In 1902, the works were dismantled and the usable material was taken to White Mills to be incorporated into an expansion of the Dorflinger plant.  The markings are on the reverse of the bottle.
KARL HUTTER 10B NEW YORK K. H. 1905 + K. H. 08-223 Hutter, Karl, (1877-1913),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 427 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Hutter mark Put bottles made by Hutter on a shelf
Appears on soda and beer bottles.  Hutter started out his career as a beer bottler and ended up in the bottler supply business.  His main claim to fame was being assigned sole rights to Charles De Quillfeldt's beer bottle closure, when it was reissued in 1877.  Hutter renamed it the "Lightning Stopper" and it quickly became the standard for the beer bottling industry.  He survived several patent infringement lawsuits during the early 1880s when his office was at 185 Bowery Street in New York and a manufactory in Bennington, Vermont.  At that time, he had a large trade with glass houses acting as a "representative character" between the bottler and glass works.  In 1892, Hutter's office at 32 Reade Street sustained fire damage.  In 1893, he patented an improvement to the Lightning, which consisted of a ceramic plug with a rubber washer to replace the metallic head of the Lightning.  In 1904, the business was still located at 32 Reade Street.  Hutter committed suicide after a long illness at his apartment overlooking Central Park on June 15, 1913.  He was 62.  At that time, the business was located at 241 Lafayette Street in New York City.  The firm later became Karl Hutter, Inc. and was still in business as late as 1930 at 241 Reade Street location. The markings are on the base or the reverse heel of the bottle. 
I. G. CO. L. Ihmsen Glass Company, Limited, (1878-1899),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 11 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ihmsen mark Put bottles made by Ihmsen Glass Co., Limited on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was founded by Christian Ihmsen Jr. in 1878 as a window glass factory. In 1878 or 1879, it took over the Christian Ihmsen & Sons, a bottle making plants, and had a factory at 14th and Neville   The company was still advertising the manufacture of soda and beer bottles in 1896 and is last listed in a 1897 Pittsburgh Directory as a Limited Company, after which the Limited was dropped.  The firm was purportedly sold to the American Window Glass Company in 1899, but was listed in a 1900 Pittsburgh Directory.  It was not listed as a glass plant in a 1904 glass trade directory.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
C. I. & CO. Ihmsen, Christian, & Company, (1854-1860),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ihmsen mark Put bottles made by Ihmsen & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was the successor to C. Ihmsen by 1854 and consisted of Christian, Charles T., and William Ihmsen and Franklin McGowin.  A disastrous 1854 fire destroyed the company's packing house and black bottle factory.  In 1857 the firm's offices were located at 104 Second Street and 133 and 135 First Street and advertised that they operated five distinct glass factories and produced window glass, flint glass, vials, black porter and mineral water bottles.  The firm became C. Ihmsen & Sons in 1860, when McGowin left the firm.  The markings are either in the front or reverse heel of the bottle.
C. IHMSEN & SONS STAR PITTS PA Ihmsen, Christian, & Sons, (1860-1876),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ihmsen mark Put bottles made by Ihmsen on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The firm was organized in 1860 and consisted of  Christian, Charles T., M. O'Connor, and William Ihmsen. Christian Ihmsen died in 1862.  In 1864, their officers were located at 104 Second Street and 133 and 135 First Street and the factory was at WIlkin's near Neville in Birmingham and produced window glass, vials, black porter and mineral water bottles.  The firm was listed in the 1875 directory and was noted as being in the hands of an estate and not operating in 1876.  Other than Dominic, no Ihmsens were listed 1877 Pittsburgh directory.  The factory was absorbed by the Ihmsen Glass Company Limited in 1878 or 1879.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
I G CO I. G. Co. 77 Illinois Glass Company, (1873-1929), See Glass Factory
Alton, IL, United States, (1873-1929) Occurs on 105 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Illinois mark Put bottles made by Illinois Glass Co. on a shelf See Manufacture's Catalogue
Gas City, IN, United States, (1900-1929),
Chicago Heights, IL, United States, (1913-1929),
Bridgeton, NJ, United States, (1920-1929),
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  In 1873, William Smith and Edward Levis organized the Illinois Glass Company and built a one furnace glass factory on Bell Street in Alton, Illinois.  Four years later, they purchased land on the Mississippi River and built a new plant there with two large furnaces.  In 1879, a third furnace was added and by 1909, there were eleven.  In 1905, over one million gross bottles were produced by hand.  In 1909 the plant had to be rebuilt to accommodate the Owens Automatic bottle making machines.  In 1876, there were 63 crew men and boys working in the plant and by 1915, there were 2,400 workers managing 31 automatic bottle making machines.  In 1900, Illinois expanded by opening a plant in Gas City, Indiana and two years later, the Illinois Pacific Glass Company was established.  In 1929, when it merged with the Owens Bottle Company to form the Owens-Illinois Glass Company  At that time, Illinois had plants in Alton, Chicago Heights, Gas City, and Bridgeton, New Jersey.  The markings appear on base or the reverse heel of the bottle.
I P G Co Illinois Pacific Glass Company, (1902-1926),
San Francisco, CA, United States, (1902-1926), Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Illinois Pacific mark Put bottles made by Illinois Pacific Glass Co. on a shelf
Los Angeles, CA, United States, (1903-1926),
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This firm was founded n 1902 when Illinois Glass Company consolidated holding and interests in several businesses in California.  In 1904, a second factory was established in Los Angles.  The 1906 San Francisco earthquake destroyed the offices and warehouses, but spared the factory.  In 1926, the company incorporated.  In 1930, they merged with the Pacific Coast Glass Company to form the Illinois Pacific Coast Company.  The marking appear on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
I. G. W. Co Indianapolis Glass Works Company, (1869-1877),
Indianapolis, IN, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Indianapolis Glass Works Co. mark Put bottles made by Indianapolis Glass Works Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Company was reported to have been started by six Germans in 1869.  The company was organized with $100,000 in capital and employed upwards of eighthly-one workers. In 1878, all of the principles were no longer listed in the directories, and neither is the glass works.  Bottles and fruit jars were listed among its products.  In 1880 the company was in receivership and in litigation.  The markings are on the base of the bottle. Notes
I S G Co 59 Interstate Glass Company, (1902-1903),
Kansas City, MO, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Indiana Safe Glass mark Put bottles made by Interstate Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Company was reported to have operated for two short years.  The markings are on the reverse heal of the bottle.
I-R Co I.-R. Company, (approx: 1890-approx:1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the I-R Co. mark Put bottles made by I.-R. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Marked on a beer bottle from the Midwest.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
J, BROS. JB JOHNS BROS. W. VA. Johns Brothers, (1893-1907),
Fairmont, WV, United States, Occurs on 22 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Johns Bros. mark Put bottles made by Johns Brothers on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This glass factory was established as the Fairmont Bottle & Fruit Jar Company in 1892.  The Johns Brothers, Robert and Jonathan, were among the initial founders. The initial company dissolved and reorganized into the Johns Brothers.  They remained in business until about 1907, when they were listed in a catalogue, but became the Fairmont Bottle Company soon after.  Robert Johns remained the manager of the new company.  The markings are on the base or the front heel of the bottle of the bottle.
K. G. B. Co. #1 Kearns-Gorsuch Bottle Company, (1894-1937),
Zanesville, OH, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Kearns-Gorsuch mark Put bottles made by Kearns-Gorsuch Bottle Co. on a shelf
Barnesville, OH, United States, (1912-1921),
Manufactured soda bottles.  The company was reorganized as the Kearns-Gorsuch Bottle Company in 1894, with $30,000 it received from the Zanesville Board.  Its predecessor  was the Kearns, Gorsuch Glass Company, which was incorporated on February 10, 1886. The offices and primary plant (plant # 1) were located at 126 Market Street, and a second plant (plant #2) was at Ridge Avenue and the Terminal Railway  In 1912, a plant was added at Barnesville, Ohio when it purchased the Barnesville Bottle Company.  This plant was not rebuilt after it was destroyed by a fire in 1921. In 1920, the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company purchased the company and it became a division.  In 1937, the Kearns-Gorsuch Bottle Co. was dissolved and absorbed into Hazel-Atlas.  Plant # 1 was closed in 1957 and in 1964 plant # 2 was purchased by the Brockway Glass Company.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
K. H. & G. Kearns, Herdman & Gorsuch, (1876-1886),
Zanesville, OH, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Kearns, Herdman & Gorsuch mark Put bottles made by Kearns, Herdman & Gorsuch on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company is purported to have started in 1876.  They published a catalogue in that year.  The predecessor company was Gorge W. Kearns & Company, which went back to 1842.  On February 10, 1886, the firm was incorporated as the Kearns, Gorsuch Glass Company.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
KENSINGTON GLASS WORKS Kensington Glass Works, (1842-1846),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Kensington mark Put bottles made by Kensington Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Henry Seybert, a wealthy chemist and investor, rented one of the closed Dyottville factories in 1842, primarily to manufacture soda bottles for Eugene Roussel. He listed the factory as the Kensington Glass Works in a Philadelphia Directory.  The works were sold to Benners, Smith and Campbell, who operated it as the Dyottville Glass Works in 1846.  The markings are on the front of the bottle.
KY. G. W. Co.
Ky. G. W. Lou. Ky KY G W K. Y. G. W.
Kentucky Glass Works Company, (1879-1889),
Louisville, KY, United States, Occurs on 11 bottles., Show distribution map of bottles with the Kentucky mark Put bottles made by Kentucky Glass Works Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The Kentucky Glass Works Company was incorporated on July 23, 1879 by Edward Bull, William Cromey and John Stanger, Sr.  This works and the Southern Glass Works were leased starting in 1886 by T. H. Sherley & Company, who were whiskey dealers and were last listed in 1889.  Research indicates that this firm used marks without "Co" designator in its earlier years.  The markings appear on the base or the reverse heel of the bottle.
H. L. N. Y. L., H., (approx: 1900-approx: 1910),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the H. L. mark Put bottles made by H. L. on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  Mark appears on the base a Hutchinson bottle and is likely of a New York City glass jobber.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
LANCASTER CO-OP GLASS WORKS Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works, (1888-96 & 1898-1903 & 1907-08),
Lancaster, NY, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lancaster Co-op mark Put bottles made by Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Lancaster Glass Works was founded in 1849.  Dr. James eventually gained control of the works and when he retired from the glass making business in 1888, a group of workmen took over the plant and formed the Lancaster Co-operative Glass Works.  It may have been briefly known as the Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works Company in 1895 and 1896, but records are contradictory.  In 1897 and 1898, it was listed as a "limited" liability company, but reverted back by 1899.  It is purported to have closed in 1903 or 1904, but reopened in 1907 and operated under this mane during 1908.  By 1909, the works was converted to a flint factory and reverted to the Lancaster Glass Works name.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
LANCASTER CO-OP GLASS WKS LD Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works Limited, (1897-1898),
Lancaster, NY, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lancaster Co-op Limited mark Put bottles made by Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works Limited on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works was briefly reorganized as a limited liability company in about 1897 and was listed as such by various period sources.  Some time during the following year, the limited liability company was dissolved.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
L. M. G. L. M. G., (approx: 1895- approx: 1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the L. M. G. mark Put bottles with the L. M. G. mark on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Unknown manufacturer or jobber who made at least four different bottles for Long Island bottlers.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
LANCASTER GLASS WORKS N. Y. Lancaster Glass Works, (1849-1861),
Lancaster, NY, United States, Occurs on 9 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lancaster mark Put bottles made by Lancaster Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The works was formed in 1849, when eight glass workers from Pittsburg formed the company Reed, Allen, Cox & Company.  By 1859, it became Reed, Shinn & Company.  In 1862, James, Gatchell & Company bought the works at auction.  Later, in 1864, Dr. James and N. B. Gatchell bought out their partners and the firm became James & Gatchell.  In 1873, Gatchell left and the works became the James Glass Works.  Gatchell ended up running the Rochester Glass Works the following year.  When James retired in 1888, a group of workmen took over the plant and formed the Lancaster Co-operative Glass Works and was still operating under that name in 1895.  between 1897 and 1898, it was listed as a "limited" company, but this was dropped by 1899  The works continued to about 1903, closed and briefly reopened in 1907 and 1908.  In 1909 it was operated as a flint glass works and reverted back to the name of Lancaster Glass Works.  The works were razed in 1920.  The markings are on the front or reverse side of the bottle.
L. G. Co. Lindell Glass Company, (approx: 1873-1890),
Saint Louis, MO, United States, Occurs on 26 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lindell mark Put bottles made by Lindell Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  It was listed as having be established within the three years prior to 1875 according to proceedings at the National Railroad Convention in 1875.  Additionally, it appears on a 1875 map of Saint Louis and lists William Gray as the president.  It was listed as operating in October 19, 1885 New York Times article.  Prior to 1886, when it established its own glass manufactory, the Adolphus Busch Brewing Company was supplied beer bottles by Lindell.  It was purported to have been absorbed by the United States Glass Company in 1890.  The markings appear on the base or reverse heel of the bottle.
The Liquid Liquid Carbonic Acid Manufacturing Company, (1888-1902),
Liquid Carbonic Company (The), (1903-1984),
Chicago, IL, United States, Occurs on 7 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Liquid mark Put bottles marked The Liquid on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  The firm was a jobber of bottles.  Jacob Baur, an Indiana druggist, came to Chicago and established the Liquid Carbonic Acid manufacturing Company in 1888.  The business was slow to start, but gradually the concept of using liquefied CO2 gas caught on and the company grew significantly.  The firm branched into manufacturing soda fountains and supplies and then moved into bottlers supplies. During 1902, the name was shortened to The Liquid Carbonic Company.  As early as 1900, the firm used the moniker "The Liquid" which is found on the base of bottles.   Aggressive advertising fueled their growth and they purchased many of their competitors.  They were acquired by CBI Industries in 1984.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
GLASS FROM F HITCHINS FACTORY LOCKPORT N. Y. LOCKPORT, N. Y. L. G. WKS Lockport Glass Works, (1843-1872),
Lockport, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lockport mark Put bottles made by Lockport Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The Lockport Glass Works was established in 1843 by a Mr. Twogood in a building that was a tallow chandlery at Gooding and Grand.  He sold the works to Parsons & Moss in 1844.  In 1845, the works are purchased by Hildreth & Company.  In 1846, they started to build a new factory in the Northeast section of Lockport.  In 1850 Francis Hitchins purchased one of the partners' interest in Hilreth & Company.  In 1851, Hitchins leased the glass factory and in 1853, he purchased the works and operated them until 1866.  In that year, it was incorporated as the Lockport Glass Manufacturing Company by a group of glassworkers.  In 1869, the works were sold to Samuel B. Rowley, a Philadelphia based fruit jar manufacturer.  Rawley made major improvements to the factory and sold it to Alonzo Mansfield in 1872 as A. J. Mansfield & Company.  In 1904, it was reorganized into the Mansfield Glass Works, was listed as closed in 1905 and sold at auction in 1908. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
L & W PITTSBURGH PA Lorenz & Wightman, (1851-1854),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lorenz & Wrightman mark Put bottles made by Lorenz & Wrightman on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This firm was formed in 1851 by Frederick Lorenz and Thomas Wightman to operate the Pittsburgh Glass Works, which was Pittsburgh's first glass house founded in 1797 by Craig & O'Hara.  When Frederick Lorenz died in October 28, 1854, Wightman retired and Lorenz's son Frederick R. Lorenz operated the works.  Frederick R. Lorenz became ill and retired before 1860 and the factory was rented to Fahnstock, Albree & Company.  The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.
L & W Lorenz & Wightman, (1862-1873),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 40 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lorenz & Wrightman mark Put bottles made by Lorenz & Wrightman on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This was a new company that took over the glass works from Fahnstock, Albree & Company, when their lease ended.  The partnership was between Moses A. Lorenz, Thomas Wightman and Alexander Nimick.  In 1870 their office was at 32 Wood Street in Pittsburgh.  The firm dissolved in 1873, when Moses Lorenz died, and became Thomas Wightman & Company.  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
F. R. L. Lorenz, Frederick R., (1854-1859),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Lorenz mark Put bottles made by Lorenz on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.   Lorenz took of the business of Lorenz & Wightman when his father died in 1854.  He operated the works through 1857 as the Penn Glass Works.  By 1860, the works were leased by Fahnstock, Albee & Company.  The markings appear on the the front or back of the bottles.
M G Co M. Glass Company, (1895-1900),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the M mark Put bottles made by M G Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This unknown company made a bottle for a Buffalo concern that operated in the latter part of the Nineteenth Century.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
M. B. & G. Co. Massillon Bottle & Glass Company, (1900-1904),
Massillon, OH, United States, Occurs on 15 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Massillon mark Put bottles made by Massillon Bottle & Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was incorporated in June, 1900 with capital of $40,000 and was short-lived.  It is listed in a 1902 Directory as a beer bottle manufacturer.  In 1904, it merged with the E. H. Everett Company, Reed & Company and the Wooster Glass Company to form the Ohio Bottle Company with capital of $4,000,000.  The following year, this new company was merged into the American Bottle Company to become the largest manufacturer of machine made beer bottles of its time.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
M G W 2 Massillon Glass Works, (1881-approx: 1895),
Massillon, OH, United States, Occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Massillon mark Put bottles made by Massillon Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The works were operated Reed & Company and more information is available under that name.  The earliest bottles of this firm used the "M G W" mark, while later bottles used the "R & Co" mark.  The exact date of transition is not certain, but it appears that the transition happened in the early 1890s.  The markings is on the base of the bottle.  Notes
MATTHEW N. Y Matthews, John, Apparatus Company, (1891-1905),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Matthews mark Put bottles made by Matthews on a shelf
Marked soda bottles.  The John Matthews Apparatus company was established in 1891, as a spin off of the firm of John Matthews.  The Apparatus company was part of a trust know as the American Soda Fountain Company and focused on the soda fountain and bottling supply aspect of the business.  The "firm of" John Matthews continued selling soda and mineral waters and syrups.  These two companies operated concurrently for the next fifteen years.  The American Soda Fountain Company started to falter and by 1906 was out of business.  The Matthews family picked up the pieces and formed the John Matthews Inc in 1906.  This company was bankrupt by 1911.  Soon after it became the Matthews Soda Water Company and by 1915 it was The Firm of John Matthews Inc., which closed by 1922.  Notes
W. M'CULLY & CO. GLASS WORKS PITTSBURGH W.McCULLY & CO. PITTSBURGH PA. WM McC & Co PITTS PA W. McCULLEY & Co. WM CcC & CO W. McC & Co. McC & Co McC McCully, William, & Company, (1851-1888 1892),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 99 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the McCully mark Put bottles made by McCully & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This firm was the second incarnation of William McCully & Company and was formed when the old company dissolved in 1851.  The previous company included Lorenz & Wightman, who went off and established a new firm by that name.  McCully & Company operated up to 5 glass houses at their peak and produced both bottle and window glass.  In 1870, these works included the Phoenix, Sligo, Pittsburgh, Empire, and Mastodon Glass Works.  Each glass house had a specialty product.  McCully died in 1869, but the company retained his name.  Production waned and in 1886, there was one factory with two furnaces.  The company was still operating in 1901 and was identified, in 1898, as a window glass company.  The markings are on the reverse side, the heel of the reverse side or base of the bottle.
S McKEE & CO McKee, Samuel, & Company, (1836-1886),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the McKee & Co. mark Put bottles made by McKee on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Samuel McKee and James Salisbury were operating the Sligo Window Glass Works in 1834.  In 1836, Samuel McKee and his brothers formed S. McKee & Company and James Salisbury went on to operate the old O'Hara works.  S. McKee & Co eventually operated two large window glass factories and a smaller bottle plant.  Samuel McKee died in late 1876 or early 1877.  His sons Christian I. and Daniel took over the firm, but retained the old name.  S. McKee & Co. were last listed as bottle manufacturers in the summer of 1885 and likely stopped bottle production after the 1885/1886 season.  S. McKee & Co. continued to manufacture window glass until late 1908 or 1909. What happened to the firm after that point is not known, but it appears to have been sold as the factory suffered a fire in 1911 and  large quantity of stored window glass was destroyed.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
MILFORD GLASS WORKS N. J. Milford Glass Works, (1838-1855),
Milford, NJ, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Milford mark Put bottles made by Milford Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This works was founded in 1838 by Matthias Simmerman as the Pendleton Glass Works.  By 1844, it was owned by Lippincott, Wisham & Company.  Prior to 1854, Cox and Whitman were the operating partners and in that year Jacob Iszard was admitted.  In 1855, Thomas Whitman was admitted as a full partner.   Soon after, the firm was in bankruptcy and the works was sold at sheriffs sale in 1856.  The property was purchased by Joseph Iszard and Samuel Iszard & Company was formed to operate the works for a short time.  They were closed prior to 1860.  The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.
M B W Millville Bottle Works, (1903-1930),
Millville, NJ, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Millville Bottle mark Put bottles made by Millville Bottle Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was founded in 1903 by James Mitchell and purportedly by W. Scott Wheaton executives of the T. C. Wheaton Company in the same town.  The company primarily manufactured druggists ware.  After W. Scott Wheaton's death in 1925, it was acquired by T. C. Wheaton Company in 1926, and appears to have operated as a subsidiary until 1930.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.
MILLVILLE GLASS WORKS L. M. & Co Millville Glass Works, (1832-1854),
Millville, NJ, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Millville mark Put bottles made by Millville Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This is believed to be the glass works established in South Millville in 1832 by Frederick Schetter.  In 1844, Schetter failed and and the works were purchased by Mulford, Hay & Company.  Since one of the later bottles is marked "L. M. & Co.," it is probable that Lewis Mulford gained a controlling interest in the business.  The works were purportedly purchased in 1854 by Whitall, Brother & Company, who operated the Phoenix Glass Works in Millville.  The markings are on the front or reverse of the bottle.
M. G. Co. Mississippi Glass Company, (approx: 1874-1988),
Saint Louis, MO, United States, Occurs on 10 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Mississippi mark Put bottles made by Mississippi Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.   Most likely the mark of the Mississippi Glass Company from Saint Louis.  George D. Humphreys moved from Connecticut to Saint Louis and established this company.    This plant started as a bottle plant and was one of the primary manufacturers of bottles for Adolphus Busch.  Busch purchased his own plants in 1886 and soon before in 1885, Mississippi retooled to a rolled plate glass plant.  In later years it was renowned for wire glass  The markings appear on the reverse heel or the base of the bottle.
MT Modes Glass Company, (1894-1898),
Cicero, IN, United States, Occurs on x bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Modes mark Put bottles made by Modes Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Modes Glass Company built a new glass factory in Cicero, Indiana and began operation in February of 1894. During 1898, the firm became the Modes-Turner Glass Company.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
MT Modes-Turner Glass Company, (1898-1909),
Cicero, IN, United States, (1898-1902), Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Modes-Turner mark Put bottles made by Modes-Turner Glass Co. on a shelf
Terre Haute, IN, United States, (1901-1909),
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Modes Glass Company built a new glass factory in Cicero, Indiana and began operation in February of 1894. During 1898, the firm became the Modes-Turner Glass Company.  The Terre Haute Commercial Cub enticed the company to come there and take over the plant of the short lived Hays Glass Company.  The operation started in a small way in 1901, but a preferred stock offering in 1902 was made to expand the Terre Haute plant at 25th & Locust Streets.  The capacity at Terre Haute nearly tripled and the plant in Cicero was closed that year.  The Cicero plant was reopened in the Fall of 1902 as the Indiana Bottle & Glass Company and operated until 1908, when it burned to the ground.  The Modes-Turner Glass Company in Terre Haute came under full control of Mr. Turner as the Turner Brothers Company in 1910.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
MONTREAL B & G CO. Montreal Bottle & Glass Company, (approx: 1880-1888),
Montreal, QE, Canada, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Montreal mark Put bottles made by Montreal Bottle & Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles. Little is currently known about this company other than it was liquidated in April of 1888.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
Nat B S Co National Bottlers' Supply Company, (1906-approx: 1908),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the National Bottlers' Supply Co. mark Put bottles made by National Bottlers' Supply Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This firm was incorporated on July 11, 1906, with capital stock of $50,000, and Richard Sands, President.  The company was located at 26 W Broadway in New York City.  Two years later, the company went into bankruptcy and one of its officers arrested. The fall off in business was attributed to the spread of prohibition in several of its markets. The markings are on the base of the bottle.
NEPTUNE GLASS WORKS Neptune Glass Works, (approx: 1857-approx: 1861),
Crowleytown, NJ, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Neptune mark Put bottles made by Neptune Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Little is know about this works. The works are reported to have opened in 1851 by Samuel Crowley on the banks of the Mullica River below Basto.  In 1852, the works were know as the Atlantic Glass Works and represented by Samuel Huffsey of Philadelphia.  This name seems to have continued until 1857 or 1858 as an undeliverable letter to this firm was published in the latter year.  About this time, Daniel Burling appears to have control of the works.  Burling was in Camden, New Jersey in 1850 and likely became familiar with the works. He is briefly listed as a merchant on Cliff Street in New York City in 1859.  In the 1860 New York Census, he is listed as being in the glass business and he is also listed in the Washington Township with the other glass workers in Crowleyville.  Soon after the works closed and were reopened in 1863 as the Crowleyville Glass Company.  It was reorganized in 1865 as the Burlington Atlantic Cape May and Philadelphia Glass Manufacturing Company.  This works appears to have failed by 1869 and the works is reported to have blown over during a storm in 1874.  In addition to its soda bottles a schnapps-type bottle is known and there is a reference to a porter bottle with an eagle motif embossed.  Bottles come both pontiled and smooth based.  The markings are on the front of the bottle.  Notes
New England Glass Bottle Co. New England Glass Bottle Company, (1826-approx:1840),
East Cambridge, MA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the New England Glass Bottle Co. mark Put bottles made by the New England Glass Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was organized in February of 1826 by act of the Massachusetts Legislature.  The specialty of the works were "junk" or black glass and green cider, porter, wine bottles and demijohns.  The works are reported to have operated until 1840 by various sources, but the last record I was able to find was in 1838 when the company's warehouse burned. The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
N in Star Newark Star Glass Works, (1871-1878),
Newark, OH, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Newark Star mark Put bottles made by Newark Star Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The works were organized in the Fall of 1871 by Shields, King & Company.  In 1876, the company displayed at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia.  In the Spring of 1878, the workers went on strike and the works were closed for two years.   On April 28, 1880, E. H. Everett took over the plant.  In 1885 it became the E. H. Everett Company.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
Newburgh Glass Co. Newburgh Glass Company, (1867-1873),
New Windsor, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Newburgh  Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by the Newburgh  Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The works commenced operation in January of 1867.  The works utilized "glass-ore" instead of sand in the production of glass and was manufactured under patent 52,917 issued on February 27, 1866.  By 1871, Burrows, Regan & Roche were in control of the works.  William Burrows, was associated with the Haggerty Glass Works in Brooklyn in 1866, but disappears from Brooklyn by the following year.  the firm is listed in directories in Orange county in 1872 and in New York City in 1873.  Burrows was involved in a drunken altercation in June of 1873 and ends up working for the Honesdale Glass Works in the fall of the same year.  It appears that the works were closed by the summer of 1873. By 1892, Burrows was operating glass factories in Birmingham, New York and Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
N. B. B. G. Co. North Baltimore Bottle Glass Company, (1888-1933),
North Baltimore, OH, United States, (1888-1895) Occurs on 81 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the North Baltimore mark Put bottles made by North Baltimore Bottle Glass Co. on a shelf
Albany, IN, United States, (1895-approx: 1903),
Terre Haute, IN, United States, (approx: 1900-1933), See Manufacture's Catalogue
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.   The company was organized in 1887 by John Geegan due to the cheap natural gas that was found in the area.  A. L. Pfue provided much of the capital and I. W. Richardson the technical expertise.  The works prospered until the gas became scarce.  The company contemplated moving, but switched to oil fired furnaces instead.  In 1895, they moved to Albany, Indiana, enticed by the abundant supplies of natural gas there.  A few years later a plant was built in Terre Haute, Indiana.  Since the company focused on the manufacture of beer and soda bottles, it was hit hard by national Prohibition and struggled to remain in business until 1933.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
N. G. Co. MIL. Northern Glass Company, (1894-1896),
Milwaukee, WI, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Northern mark Put bottles made by Northern Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company took over the old idle Cream City Glass Company works in 1894.  Due to poor management and poor quality glass, the works was sold to William Franzen in 1896.  It is not known if Franzen continued to use this mark or if it was solely used the company prior to his acquisition.  He did not incorporate the name of William Franzen & Son until 1900.   Known marked bottles date to the 1894-96 period of the failed works and support he fact it was not used by Franzen. The markings appear on the front heel of the bottle. 
NUTTALL & CO. MAKERS ST HELENS N. & Co. Nuttall & Company, (1842-1913),
Edge Hill Station, Liverpool, England, (1842-approx: 1850),
Thatto Heath, Liverpool, England, (approx: 1850-approx: 1872),
Saint Helens, England,  (approx: 1872-1913), Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Nuttall mark Put bottles made by Nuttall & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The company was founded by Francis Dixon and John Merson in the 1840s.  Nuttall & Company claimed to be founded in 1842.  The first factory was built near Edge Hill Station near Liverpool.  By 1852. it had moved to Thatto Heath.  In 1872, a modern factory was built at Saint Helens.   This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913, but the firm continued to use its brand name.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.
N. & Co. Ltd 3420 Nuttall & Company Limited, (1913-2001),
Saint Helens, England, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Nuttall mark Put bottles made by Nuttall & Co. Ltd. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The company was founded by Francis Dixon and John Merson in the 1840s.  Nuttall & Company claimed to be founded in 1842.  The first factory was built near Edge Hill Station near Liverpool.  By 1852. it had moved to Thatto Heath.  In 1872, a modern factory was built at Saint Helens.  This company was absorbed into the United Glass Bottle Manufacturers, Limited in 1913, but continued to use its brand name.  The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
O in Diamond O, (approx: 1895-approx: 1905),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the O mark Put bottles made by O on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This unknown manufacturer made beer bottles for a New York firm and Charles Joly, a Philadelphia based bottler, who dabbled with bottling supplies as a side line.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
O in Triangle O, (approx: 1900-approx: 1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the O mark Put bottles made by O on a shelf
Manufactured soft drink bottles.  This unknown manufacturer made mineral water bottles for the Mount Holyoke Lithia Spring Water Company.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
O. B. Co. Ohio Bottle Company, (1904-1905),
Newark, OH, United States, Occurs on 22 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ohio Bottle mark Put bottles made by Ohio Bottle Co. on a shelf
Massillon, OH, United States, (1904-1905),
Wooster, OH, United States, (1904-1905),
Manufactured soda bottles.  The company was formed on August 4, 1904 by Edward H. Everett, Lorenz S. Stoehr, David Reed, James F. Pocock and Jacob C. Haring. It consolidate the glass factories of the E. H. Everett Glass Company in Newark, Reed & Company in Massillon, the Massillon Bottle & Glass Company in Massillon and the Wooster Glass Company of Wooster.  The Ohio Bottle Company held an exclusive contract to manufacture soda and beer bottles on the Owens Automatic Bottle Machine.  On August 22, 1905, incorporation papers were filed and these works were consolidated into the American Bottle Company in September.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
OD Old Dominion Glass Company, (1901-1928+),
Alexandria, VA, United States, Occurs on 6 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Old Dominion mark Put bottles made by Old Dominion Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The company was formed in April of 1901 by Henry K. Field, Lorenzo Walford, G. D. Hopkins, O. R. Hopkins, M. L. Pierce, jr., and H. E. Downham.  A factory was built at the outlet lock of the old Alexandria Canal during the summer of 1901 and the factory commenced operations on September 3rd with sand from the Severn River; its source for many years.  This factory proved to be the most successful of the four contemporary factories in Alexandria.  Even with a series of disastrous fires, this company eventually purchased and operated the plants of the Bella Pre, Virginia, and Alexandria glass works.  Its main products were flint bottles including pint and quart flasks and beer and soda water bottles.  The company and plant continued to be listed until 1928 in the Alexandria directories.  Its status in 1929 is not known, but by 1930 it was no longer in business.  The   The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
Olean Glass Co Olean N. Y. Olean Glass Company, (1883-1913),
Olean, NY, United States, Occurs on 2 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Olean mark Put bottles made by Olean Glass Co. on a shelf
Port Allegheny, PA, United States, (1896-1913),
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The company was established in 1883 by Eastern glass blowers and local investors encouraged by a board of trade.  The availability of a good quality of sand rock and fuel made Olean a good place to locate a glass factory.  The business failed within a year. The Union Glass Works was organized in 1884 to restart the operation, but this firm soon failed as well.  The Olean Glass company continued to own the works until May of 1887, when S. W. Pancoast, who left the original operation in 1883, returned to operate the factory.  He started out with one blower and gradually built a successful business.  The plant was purported to be the first to use natural gas as a fuel.  The company became a stock company in 1894.  In 1896, a second plant, specializing in flint bottles, was established in Port Allegheny due to an abundant gas supply.   S. W. Pancoast and his sons withdrew from the firm starting in 1900.  One son, Vernon,  went on to establish the New York Glass Works.  The Olean works continued to expand until 1913, when it was sold to the Acme Glass Company also in Olean.  During 1913,  the firm experienced a run of bad luck: a flood, a fire, loss of revenue due to a bankrupt customer, failure of the gas supply at the Port Allegheny plant, and difficulty in securing boys to work in the factory.  The Port Allegheny plant was sold to a group of its blowers, who likely had some local funding.  Acme only operated the plant for a short time and it was abandoned as a manufactory in 1914.  Small businesses operated in some of the buildings while others went derelict.  In 1925, the property was sold to a local firm looking for oil and using it as a coal depot.  The Acme company was purchased by the Eastern Glass company in 1926. The owners, from New York City, fled the country in 1929 after perpetrating fraud.  The company was run by a receiver, and sold within that same year to local investors.  It was named the Olean Glass Company, Incorporated, and   purchased by Thatcher Manufacturing company in 1935. Thatcher closed the plant in 1948. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Presentation of the mark is an estimation of the appearance.  Notes
Thomas O'Neil Mfr Boston O'Neil, Thomas A., (1890-1895),
Boston, MA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Thomas O'Neil mark Put bottles made by Thomas O'Neil on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Thomas O'Neil was a glass jobber and dealer in crockery who started his business in 1890.  An 1891 ad called out bottlers ware as a specialty.  By 1896, he was a part of the firm of John Conlon & Co. who were wholesale liquor dealers.  Notes
O Owens Bottle Company, (1919-1929),
Toledo, OH, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Owens Bottle Co. mark Put bottles made by Owens Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Owens Bottle company was formed on May 1, 1919 with a name change from the Owens Bottle Machine Company.  At the time they were the largest manufactures of bottles in the world.  The company merged with the Illinois Glass Company in 1929 to form the Owens-Illinois Glass Company.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
O I Owens-Illinois Glass Company, (1929-1966),
Toledo, OH, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Owens-Illinois mark Put bottles made by Owens-Illinois Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The company was formed with the merger of the Owens and Illinois glass companies in 1929.  The company became Owens-Illinois Incorporated in 1966.  The OI over a diamond marking was used from 1929 to 1954 when it was replaced with an I in an O.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle. 
P. C. G. W. Pacific Coast Glass Works, (1900-1925),
San Francisco, CA, United States, Occurs on 27 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Pacific Coast mark Put bottles made by Pacific Coast Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  After they sold the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Company, George Newman and Carlton Davis reentered the glass business and by 1900 had established the Pacific Coast Glass Works.  There is mention of an accident at the "San Francisco & Pacific Coast Glass Works" on Thanksgiving Day in 1900 at the Berkley-Sanford football game.  About 300 spectators had assembled on the roof of the new and partially completed works when the roof collapsed, thirteen were killed and over a hundred others were seriously injured.  The newspaper account stated the game continued and Sanford won 5 to 0.  One employee who left the company in 1916, claimed he worked there for 16 years, starting as an apprentice and placing the company in business in 1900.  The company survived the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, even though some of its facilities at 7th & Irwin Streets were destroyed by the ensuing fires.  The company was renamed the Pacific Coast Glass Company in 1925.  Later in 1930, it became part of the Illinois-Pacific Coast Company.  The markings appear on the base or the reverse heel of the bottle. 
PACIFIC GLASS WORKS Pacific Glass Works, (1862-1876),
San Francisco, CA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Pacific Glass mark Put bottles made by Pacific Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was organized in 1862 and glass was first blown in 1863.  Carlton Newman left the company and established another glass house in 1865.  The company passed hands several times and was eventually purchased by Carlton Newman and merged with the San Francisco Glass Works to form the San Francisco & Pacific Glass works in 1876.  The markings are on the face or base of the bottle.
P. G. W. Pennsylvania Glass Company, (1887-1925),
Meadville, PA, United States, (1887-1889) Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Pennsylvania Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by Pennsylvania Glass Co. on a shelf
Anderson, IN, United States, (1889-1915),
Dunbar, WV, United States, (1915-1922),
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was attracted from Rochester, PA to Meadville in 1887 by the Meadville Board of Industry.  The factory employed about 100 men and was burned to the ground in early 1889.  The company them moved to Anderson, IN, attracted by free land and gas.  When the gas ran out, the company relocated to Dunbar West, WV.  In the early days it was also known as works as well as company.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.   Notes
PHOENIX GLASS WORKS PHILA Phoenix Glass Works, (1838-approx: 1875),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Phoenix mark Put bottles made by Phoenix Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This glass works was founded in 1806 by James Lee in Millville, New Jersey.  After going through several owners, Burgin & Wood of Philadelphia took over the works in 1827.  Their offices were in Philadelphia and remained there through several owners.  In 1829, it was Burgin, Wood & Pearsall and starting in 1833 Burgin & Pearsall.  In 1836, Scattergood, Booth & Company operated the works.  From, 1838 to 1844 Scattergood, Haverstick & Company operated the works.  It is during this time, in 1840, that the Phoenix Glass Works name is first recorded.  In 1844 the firm became Scattergood & Whitall and remained so until 1845, when it became Whitall & Brother.  In 1850, it became Whitall Brothers & Company.  The Phoenix name continued to be used during this period.  In 1854, they acquired the Millville Glass Works.  During 1857 the firm became Whitall, Tatum & Company and 1901, Whitall Tatum Company.  The focus in later years was druggists ware, but an 1880 catalogue still listed mineral water bottles as a product.  Phoenix was used until 1875, but was dropped by 1880.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
PHOENIX GLASS WORKS BROOKLYN Phoenix Glass Works, (1848-approx: 1855),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Phoenix mark Put bottles made by Phoenix Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  The Phoenix Glass Company was incorporated in December of 1848 with capital of $7,500, according to court documents, and were listed in 1850 at John near Hudson avenue in Brooklyn with an office at 38 Burling Slip in New York with Robert B. Clark as Secretary.  The company was noted as still being in business in 1852 after a suspension of three months.  The markings are on the face of the bottle.  Notes
P. B. & CO. Pollack Brothers & Company, (approx: 1900-approx: 1920),
Montreal, QE, Canada, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the P. B. & Company mark Put bottles made by Pollack Brothers & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This firm was not listed in the 1895 Montreal Directory and appears on Canadian glass and pottery bottles of the period 1900 to 1920.  The firm is reported to have had a branch in Toronto briefly. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
BRANCH 62 UNION F MADE PO'KEEPSIE Poughkeepsie Glass Works, (1880-1914),
Poughkeepsie, NY, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Poughkeepsie Glass Works mark Put bottles made by Poughkeepsie Glass Works on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  This glass factory was formed in 1880 to take over the failed Anglo-American Glass Company, which was formed in 1879 to make glass bottles from iron slag of an adjacent iron works.  Instead of the traditional pot furnaces, the company installed a continuous tank; the first in the United States.  The company manufactured a general line of bottles and fruit jars, which were a specialty. Its manufacture in the later years was heavily focused on milk bottles made under contract for the Empire Bottle and Supply Company.  Empire pushed major expansions in the facilities and this proved to be a risky business proposition as the company could not repay its debts.  The company files for bankruptcy in 1912, from which it recovered, only to fall into a final bankruptcy in 1914, which resulted in liquidation.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  The mark is actually the label of the local glass makers union.  Notes
H. W. P. 48 PUTNAM 33 Putnam, Henry William, (approx: 1878-approx: 1947),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 63 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Putnam mark Put bottles made by Putnam on a shelf
Appears on soda and beer bottles.  Charles De Quillfeldt assigned rights to his stopper for beer bottles to Karl Hutter in 1875 and William Putnam in 1877.  Putnam trade marked the stopper "Lightning" and applied this patent to fruit jars in 1882.  Putnam and Karl Hutter were codefendants in at least one law suit defending the 1877 reissue of De Quillfeldt 1874 patent.  Putnam appears to have been involved in the bottlers supply business as a jobber.  Putnam turned the business over to his son, William Henry Putnam, Jr., in 1898 and moved to San Diego. The business was worth about $5 million at that time.  A trade mark was reissued in 1947 to the company.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
Q C Queen City Glass Company, (1890-1905),
Cumberland, MD, United States, Occurs on 3 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Queen City mark Put bottles made by Queen City Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Warren Glass Company was established on Queen & Railroad Streets in Cumberland in 1880 to primarily manufacture milk bottles. This works closed in 1888 and was reopened in 1889 as the South Cumberland Glass Company.  In 1890, the Queen City Glass Company was organized and operated until about 1905, when it ran into financial difficulties and an overstock of bottles in its warehouse.  It works were idle until 1909, when a group of Pennsylvanian investors reopened the works as the Eastern Glass Company.  The works manufactured flint bottles.  The markings appears on the base of the bottle.   Notes
E. P. REED & Co. Reed & Company, (1881-1904),
Massillon, OH, United States, Occurs on 21 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Reed & Company mark Put bottles made by Reed & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  David Reed and Joseph S. Reed were born in New Jersey and in 1880 worked at the Clyde Glass works.  In 1881 they organized the Reed & Company glass works in Massillon, Ohio.  The specialty of this works was beer bottles and they supplied the major brewers, but also manufactured fruit jars and flint ware.  In 1898 they made over 10 million bottles and in the same year started shipping to Mexico, which developed into a large trade.  In 1904, Reed & Company became part of the Ohio Bottle Company.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
E. P. REED & Co. Reed, E. P., & Company, (1889-1894),
Rochester, NY, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the F. E. Reed & Company mark Put bottles made by F. E. Reed & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Rochester Glass Works was reopened in 1881 by former members of the Clyde Glass Works.  In January, 1889, the firm became E. P. Reed & Company.  In 1894, with the death of E. P. Reed, the firm became F. E. Reed.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
F. E. R. Reed, Frank E., (1894-approx: 1901),
Rochester, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the F. E. Reed mark Put bottles made by F. E. Reed on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  With the death of E. P. Reed in 1894, the Rochester Glass Works went under the name of Frank E. Reed, who operated the works until about 1901, when it the firm became a co-partnership known as Frank E. Reed & Company.  The firm specialized in bottles for brewers.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.   Notes
F. E. R. & Co. Reed, Frank E., & Company, (approx: 1901-1908),
Rochester, NY, United States, Occurs on 4 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the F. E. Reed & Company mark Put bottles made by F. E. Reed & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  About 1901, Frank E. Reed formed a partnership know as the Frank E. Reed & Company.  Later in 1908, the firm was incorporated as the Frank E. Reed Glass Company with capital of $165,000.   The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
R Reed, Frank E., Glass Company, (1908-1957),
Rochester, NY, United States, Occurs on 3 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the F. E. Reed Glass Company mark Put bottles made by F. E. Reed Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soft drink bottles.  In 1908, the Frank E. Reed & Company  incorporated as the Frank E. Reed Glass Company with capital of $165,000.  By 1933, the company incorporated.  The company was in bankruptcy in 1957.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
R. G. & B. Co. Rhodes Glass & Bottle Company, (1901-approx: 1919),
Massillon, OH, United States, Occurs on 9 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Rhodes Glass & Bottle Company mark Put bottles made by Rhodes Glass & Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was organized in January of 1901 with F. R. Shepley as president. There is mention of a strike that occurred in October of 1901.  The firm is listed in Johnson's 1902 business directory as a manufacturer of light green and amber bottles, of which beer bottles were a specialty. Several references in 1913 were found. The company is purported to have closed about 1919 and with beer bottles a primary product, national Prohibition would have been devastating to the business.  The markings appear on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
H. Ricketts & Co. Glass Works Bristol Henry Ricketts & Company, (1811-1851),
Bristol, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Henry Ricketts & Company mark Put bottles made by Henry Ricketts & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured mineral water bottles.  In 1785, a flint glass works was built on the site of the �Phoenix Inn� in Temple Gate by James and George Taylor. This Phoenix Glass Works was acquired by John Wadham, Jacob Wilcox and Richard Ricketts in August of 1789. In 1811, the partnership was reorganized and consisted of Jacob Wilcox Ricketts, his son Henry Ricketts, David Evans and John Cave. At this time, they expanded by acquiring a bottle factory at Cheese Lane, St Philips. Henry Ricketts December 5, 1821 patent for molding Bottles for wine, porter, beer, or cider, revolutionized the industry. Ricketts� patent popularized the three mold and his bottles with �PATENT� on the shoulder became the often copied acme of the industry. Richard Ricketts took over business when Henry retired in 1851 and the firm became Richard Ricketts & Company. In 1853, Richard joined with William & Thomas Powell and Richard Filer, who owned the Hooper�s Glasshouse, to form Powell, Ricketts & Filer. This firm operated until 1857, when it became Powell & Ricketts. This business closed in 1923.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
GLASS WORKS PAT 85 ROCHESTER, N. Y. Rochester Glass Works, (approx: 1881-1888),
Rochester, NY, United States, Occurs on 11 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Rochester mark Put bottles made by Rochester Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles. C. B. Woodworth & Son were proprietors of the Rochester Glass Works in 1869.  In 1876, Nathan Gatchell, of Gatchell & Company, was operating the works.  He was from Lockport, New York.  The plant was idle for a number of years, when in 1881 several former members of the Clyde Glass Works reopened the works under the name of Kelly & Company.  In January, 1889, the firm became E. P. Reed & Company.  In 1894, with the death of E. P. Reed, the firm became Frank E. Reed and about 1901 became the Frank E. Reed & Company. In 1903, it was still referred to as the Rochester Glass Works.  In 1908, the firm incorporated as the Frank E. Reed Glass Company.  In, 1925, with the death of Frank E. Reed, control passed to his sons and in 1927, it became the Reed Glass Company.  The business went idle in 1957.  Later the plant was operated by Castle-Hanson Glass Company.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  The Rochester mark is similar to the Clyde mark.  Notes
R. G. Co. Root Glass Company, (1901-1932),
Terre Haute, IN, United States, Occurs on 47 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Root mark Put bottles made by Root Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  Chapman J. Root established two glass works in Terre Haute: one for beverage bottles and the second for fruit jars.  Root had worked for the North Baltimore Bottle Glass Company, which had relocated to Terre Haute in 1900.  The beverage plant started operation in 1901 and the fruit jar plant the following year.  Ball Brothers purchased the fruit jar plant in 1909, but the beverage plant operated until 1932, when it was purchased by Owens-Illinois, so the family could focus on its Coca-Cola bottling business.  Root was famous for creating the design of the Coca-Cola bottle in 1915.  The markings are on the base of the bottle or on the heel.
CODD'S PATENT 4 MAKERS RYLAND & CODD BARNSLEY Rylands & Codd, (1877-1881),
Barnsley, England, Occurs on 11 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ryland & Codd mark Put bottles made by Ryland & Codd on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This partnership was formed in 1877 between Ben Rylands and Hiram Codd.  Rylands owned the Hope Glass Works and Codd held the patent for a marble closure for soda bottles.  Ben Rylands died in 1881 and his son Dan joined the firm in his place.  At this time the name was changed to "Codd & Rylands" The partnership with Codd dissolved in late 1884.  The Hope Glass Works used the mark of "4" on its glassware to signify it products attributes of accuracy, cleanliness, neatness and strength.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
DAN RYLANDS 4 SOLE MAKER BARNSLEY Rylands, Dan, (1884-1897),
Barnsley, England, Occurs on 15 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Ryland mark Put bottles made by Rylands on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was formed with the breakup of Codd & Rylands in late 1884.  Rylands became a limited liability company, Dan Rylands Limited, in 1888, but appears to have still used the Dan Rylands identifier.  In 1897, the company was reorganized as the Rylands Glass and Engineering Company Limited.  Bottles after this date are marked "THE RYLANDS."  The company went out of business in 1928 partially due to it focus on manufacturing Codd bottles, which were being phased out in England due to sanitary concerns.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
S S, (approx: 1897-approx: 1903),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the S mark Put bottles made by S on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  A second bottle with this mark surfaced from Terre Haute, Indiana.  It is believed that this mark is for the Streeter Glass Company that was located in Greenfield and then Terre Haute.  There is interesting collaborating information, but there is not any conclusive evidence at this point.  This firm primarily made fruit jars, but was know to make bottles.  The marking, an "S" in a shield, appears on the base of the bottle.  Notes
A. C. S. & Co. S., A. C., & Company, (approx: 1905-approx: 1915),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the A. C. S. & Co. mark Put bottles made by A. C. S. & Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Two bottles are know with this marking; a soft drink bottle from Providence and a whiskey flask from Philadelphia.  One possibility would be A. G. Smalley & Co., but the middle initial on both bottle appears to be a "C."  The "A. C. S & Co." mark appears on the base of the bottle.  Notes
S. F. & P. G. W. San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works, (1876-1899),
San Francisco, CA, United States, Occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works mark Put bottles made by San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  Was formed by Carlton Newman's merger of the San Francisco and Pacific Glass Works in 1876.  Carlton Newman died on March 8, 1889 and control passed to his son George Newman.  The business deteriorated and was sold to the Abramson, Heunish Glass Company in 1899.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.
SAN FRANCISCO GLASS WORKS San Francisco Glass Works, (1869-1876),
San Francisco, CA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the San Francisco mark Put bottles made by San Francisco Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  After it was destroyed by fire in 1869, Carlton Newman rebuilt his flint glass plant and renamed it from the San Francisco Flint Glass Works to the San Francisco Glass Works.  He took in Charles Duvall as a partner a year later.  Duvall retired in 1873.  In 1876 with the death of John Bennett, Newman purchased the Pacific Glass Works and renamed the combined company the San Francisco & Pacific Glass Works. The markings appear on the face of the bottle.
F. & L. SCHAUM BALTIMORE GLASS WORKS Schaum, F. & L., (1850-1852),
Baltimore, MD, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Schaum mark Put bottles made by F. & L. Schaum on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Baltimore Glass Works was being operated by Schaum, Reitz & Company in 1849.  By 1851, it was being operated by F. & L. Schaum.  Purportedly they closed the plant and it was later operated by Baker Brothers & Company.  The markings are on the front shoulder of the bottle.
W. M. SCHWENKER NEW YORK Schwenker, William M., (1883-1916),
New York, NY, United States, Occurs on 8 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Schwenker mark Put bottles made by Schwenker on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  Schwenker was a supplier of brewers materials.  He started out selling belting, then rubber hoses and other rubber goods and onto a general list of brewers supplies.  At some point during his career he dealt in beer bottles.  He died in late 1912 or early 1913 and his estate carried on the business. Between 1916 and 1918, the firm incorporated and was still operating in 1922.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
Scranton Glass Co. Scranton Glass Company, (1907-approx: 1930),
Dunmore, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Scranton mark Put bottles made by Scranton Glass Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  There were several glass companies in Scranton.  The Scranton Glass Company Limited operated from 1881 to 1887, when it incorporated as the Scranton Glass Company. At its height the Scranton Glass Company employed 800 men and boys; however, it experienced financial difficulties in 1895 and ceased to operate in 1896.  A Scranton Glass Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1899 and appears to have operated until about 1903.  About 1907, Anthony Francis McDonnell operated a second Scranton Glass Company at 1341 Jefferson St, Dunmore PA.  This was his parents' home, therefore it is likely that his business was that of a glass jobber rather than a manufacturer.  McDonnell also patented and trade marked the Sanitop Bottle closure and operated into the 1920s if not later. The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
S. G. CO. Severn Glass Company, (1897-1902),
Annapolis, VA, United States, Occurs on 19 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Severn mark Put bottles made by Severn Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This works was the successor to the Annapolis Glass Company, which was founded in 1885 on Horn Point later known as the Eastport section of Annapolis.  The attraction of Annapolis was a fine quality of glass sand found on the Severn River nearby.  The Annapolis Glass Co. was offered for sale in 1891 and a glass works was listed in a 1893 report.  The Severn Glass Co. was incorporated in the state of Maryland on July 23, 1897 with $10,000 in capital stock, but may have been operating earlier.  They had a branch office in Baltimore, where most of the marked bottles occur.  The works were operating successfully in 1901 and are purported to have closed in 1902.  They were not listed in a 1910 directory.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
H. B. Sleeman Sleeman, Henry Bedford, (approx: 1889-approx: 1902),
Manchester, England, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the H. B. Sleeman mark Put bottles made by H. B. Sleeman on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  H. B. Sleeman was involved in the East India trade starting in about 1866 and continued well into the Twentieth Century.  The firm was mainly involved in selling druggists supplies and sundries.  In the later part of the Nineteenth Century, he expanded into the West Indian and North American markets.  From his start until about 1888, the firm was known as H. B. Sleeman & Company.  After that date and until at least 1902, he appears to be operating on his own.  By 1905, the firm was H. B. Sleeman & Co. again.  Henry withdrew from the firm in 1910 and died in 1912, but his firm was still listed in 1939 as a limited liability company.   The markings are on the reverse heel of the bottle.  Notes
A. G. Smalley & Co. Made By Boston Smalley, Albert G., & Company, (1877-1906),
Boston, MA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Smalley & Co. mark Put bottles made by Smalley & Co. on a shelf
Appears on beer bottles.  Albert G. Smalley was born in Belfast, Maine in about 1851.  Sometime prior to 1870, he moved to Boston and found employment as a bookkeeper.  In 1873, he a member of the firm of Lovell & Smalley, who were glass manufacturer agents.  The following year, 1874, he worked for E. A. Buck & Company, who were engaged in the same business.  E. A. Buck & Co. appear to have been sold to the newly formed Dean, Foster & Co. in 1875 and Smalley was a member of this new firm.  However in 1876, E. A. Buck & Co. appears to have been reconstituted just two doors up from Dean, Foster & Co. and Smalley was now a principle in this firm.  The following year, 1877, E. A. Buck & Co. became A. G. Smalley & Co.  Smalley & Co. were initially jobbers for druggist ware and sundries, but as indicated by ads, sold beer bottles and stoppers.  In later years, the firm seems to have dropped the bottlers line and focused on fruit jars and milk bottles in addition to druggist ware.  On November 1, 1906 the firm was incorporated, Smalley died in 1907, and 1917 the firm was dissolved.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.  Notes
S P S., P., (1847-1857),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the S. P. mark Put bottles made by S. P. Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This mark appears on the base of a porter bottle and has all of the characteristics of a New England manufacturer.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle and may be obscured by the pontil.  Notes
S. I. G. W. Southern Indiana Glass Works, (1907-1913),
Loogootee, IN, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Southern Indiana mark Put bottles made by Southern Indiana Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Incorporated on December 5, 1907 with a name change from the Lythgoe Bottle Company, which was established in 1901 when natural gas was discovered near Loogootee.  In 1913, it became the Graham Glass Company and was merged into the Owens-Illinois Glass Company in 1929.  The markings appear on the reverse heel of the bottle.
Star mark Star Glass Works, (1869-1879),
New Albany, IN, United States, Occurs on 12 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Star mark Put bottles made by Star Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  This company was formed in 1869, primarily for the manufacture of plate glass by John B. Ford, but bottles were also a product as demonstrated by this 1870 description "The Star Glass Company have extensive houses and machinery for making all sizes of fine finished plate glass and mirrors, and are, also, largely engaged in the manufacture of window glass and bottles."  In that same year, 1870, W. C. DePauw acquired a half interest in the company. In 1879 W. C. DePauw acquired all of the stock of the Star Glass Company and renamed it the W. C. DePauw Glass Company.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
99 S. B. & G. CO. 19 Streator Bottle & Glass Company, (1881-1905),
Streator, IL, United States, Occurs on 118 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Streator mark Put bottles made by Streator Bottle & Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  This company was formed in June of 1881 and the factory was operational in October of that year.  The works were generally successful and expanded over the years.  The company became part of the American Bottle Company in 1905  The markings are on the reverse heel or base of the bottle.
T. C. Co. T. C. Company, (approx: 1900-approx: 1910),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the T. C. Co. mark Put bottles made by T. C. Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Appears on a Hutchinson bottle.  The markings is on the base of the bottle.
A. T. G. A. T. G., (approx: 1895-approx: 1905),
Unknown, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the A. T. G. mark Put bottles made by A. T. G. on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  Appears on a Hutchinson bottle.  The markings is on the reverse heel of the bottle.
S. TWITCHELL & BRO. MFRS F. B. S. 2 Twitchell, Selden, & Brother, (approx: 1880-approx: 1891),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 26 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Twitchell mark Put bottles made by Twitchell & Bro. on a shelf
Appears on soda bottles.  Selden and Oscar Twitchell were one of the largest bottlers supply houses in the United States.  They were the sons of the famous George S. Twitchell, who was an early and well to do mead and mineral water manufacturer in Philadelphia.  The company became S. Twitchell Company about 1891 and later opened a branch in Camden, New Jersey, and still later moved its headquarters there.  The company was still in business in 1991. The markings are on the base of the bottle and are associated with the Roorback's two 1885 patents, which were marketed as the "Twitchell Floating Ball" closure and often marked "F. B. S." for "Floating Ball Stopper."
UNION GLASS WORKS NEW LONDON CT. Union Glass Works, (1856-1858),
New London, CN, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Union Glass mark Put bottles made by Union Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was organized on August 27, 1856.  By 1859, it was operating as the New London Glass Company.  The markings are on the front face of the bottle.
UNION GLASS WORKS PHILAD. A Union Glass Works, (1847-1857),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 163 Bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Union Glass mark Put bottles made by Union Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  William Hartell & J. Lancaster reopened the Union Glass Works, on the Delaware River and in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, in 1847 and operated the factory there until Hartell's death in 1857.  Thomas Hartell joined the firm in 1850.  The works were closed and Thomas Hartell partnered with John Letchworth in the firm of Hartell & Letchworth in 1858 with a factory located at 24th and George Street, near the Schuylkill River.   The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle or on the reverse heel.
UNION LAVA WORKS Union Lava Works, (approx: 1852-approx: 1855),
Conshohocken, PA, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Union Lava mark Put bottles made by Union Lava Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  William H. Smith of Philadelphia patented a method of using slag from iron furnaces as a base for the manufacture of "lava-ware" in 1852.  As there were no glass workers listed in the 1850 census for Conshohocken, the works must have stated in that year and appear to be short lived.   The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.
V & M VanKeuren & Stone Bottle Company, (1913-1923),
Roulette, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the VanKeuren & Stone Bottle Co. mark Put bottles made by VanKeuren & Stone Bottle Co. on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  Roulette was on very productive gas field in Potter county. With rail connections to more populated areas, it was only natural that a glass works would be established in the local.  A window glass works plant, called the Roulette Glass Company, was established in 1903 and burned about 1908. In 1912, the Roulette Bottle Manufacturing Company was in operation.  It went bankrupt by January of the following year. In 1913, W. G Vankueren and John T. Stone, local business men, acquired the works and operated it as the VanKueren & Stone Bottle Company or the V & M Bottle company. The works produced flint bottles, which are know to have a particular tint to the glass.  During the next ten years the firm was owned by several different entities, but retained the V & M name.  The firm's mark have also been found on flint flasks and prescription bottles.  In 1923, the plant was purchased by investors from Buffalo to manufacture fruit jars.  The company was called initially called Roulette Glass Company and then a short time later, the Vacuum Bottle Company.  It suddenly went insolvent in May of the following year.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
V. G. Co. Virginia Glass Company, (approx: 1897-1914),
Alexandria, VA, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Virginia Glass Co. mark Put bottles made by Virginia Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  The Virginia Glass Works was established in Alexandria, Virginia in 1893 by eight experienced glass blowers.  The works were listed in 1897 as incorporated with seven members.  Over the years, various members of the firm split off to form the Old Dominion Glass Company and the Belle Pre Glass Company, also of Alexandria.  By 1905 only two of the original partners, John S. Bordner and Peter Astryke, remained.  These two also invested in the Southern Glass Company in Richmond starting in 1899.  As they turned their attention to the Richmond Works, with a major fire at the Virginia Works in 1905, and with Astryke in failing health, the Virginia Glass Company suffered.  It was sold at auction in 1909 to W. E. Gilbert and W. Gwynn, who incorporated the works in September of that year.  In 1911, the plant closed down again, but was reopened by 36 glass blowers on a cooperative plan in January of 1912.  June of 1914 may have been the last the plant operated.  It was involved in several litigations, did not pay its corporate fees in 1916 and was dissolved in 1918 due to two years of nonpayment.    The markings are on the reverse side of the bottle.  Notes
W. G. M. CO. Buckle mark Western Glass Manufacturing Company, (1900-1909),
Denver, CO, United States, Occurs on 15 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Western mark Put bottles made by Western Glass Manufacturing Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The Western Flint Glass Company was reorganized into the Western Glass Manufacturing Company in November of 1900.  A facsimile mark of the corporate seal was registered in January of 1901 and became the mark that identifies most of the bottles manufactured by this company.  It is often called the "buckle."  This mark is found on many bottles form the Rocky Mountain states.  In December of 1909 a fire destroyed the factory buildings and the plant closed operation.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Distinctive numbers can be observed on the front heel of some of the bottles and known numbers include 10, 15, 20 and 40 on soda bottles and 5, 30, 50 and 70 on beer bottles.
W. T. CO. Whitall-Tatum Company, (1901-1938),
Philadelphia, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Whitall-Tatum Co. mark Put bottles made by Whitall-Tatum Co. on a shelf
Appears on syrup bottles.  This works was founded in 1806 by James Lee as a window glass factory in Millville, New Jersey. It went through a series of owners including: Gideon Smith, Nathanial & Solomon, Burgin & Wood (1829), Burgin, Wood & Pearsall (1830-32), Burgin & Pearsall (1833-1835), Scattergood, Booth & Co. (1836-1838), Scattergood, Haverstick & Co. (1839-1844), Scattergood & Whitall (1845), Whitall & Brother (1846-1849), Whitall, Brother & Co. (1850-1857), Whitall, Tatum & Co. (1858-1900). Starting in 1901, the firm became Whitall-Tatum & Company.  Starting with Burgin & Wood, the early owners were Philadelphia druggists and these firms specialized in druggists wares.  The Whitall's being Quakers, refused to manufacture bottles for whiskey, wine or malt beverages, nor would they sell glass to the army or navy.  The main output of Whitall-Tatum Co. were druggists bottles and insulators, although they manufactured syrup bottles for use at soda fountains. The firm was sold to the Armstrong Cork Co. in 1938 and sold again to the A. H. Kerr & Co. in 1968, subsequent owners were Foster-Forbes Glass and American Can.  The plant closed in 1999. The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
WHITNEY GLASS WORKS GLASSBORO, N. J. Whitehead, Ihmsen & Phillips, (1836-1837),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Whitehead, Ihmsen & Phillips mark Put bottles made by Whitehead, Ihmsen & Phillips on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  These works were established in about 1836 by Thomas Whitehead, Charles Ihmsen and William Phillips and called the Pennsylvania Glass Works. There was a flint glass factory and a black glass factory, which was about a quarter of the size of the flint operation.  The firm was dissolved by 1838 and each of the partners went on to establish other works.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
WHITNEY GLASS WORKS GLASSBORO, N. J. Whitney Glass Works, (1839-1918),
Glassboro, NJ, United States, Occurs on 2 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Whitney mark Put bottles made by Whitney Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  These works were established in 1775 by glass men from Wistar's Glassworks in Alloways Creek.  In 1839, the Whitney Brothers were in control of the Harmony Glass Works.  By 1861, the works were known as the Whitney Glass Works as seen on bottles, even though the company was known as Whitney Brothers.  In 1887, the name was officially changed to Whitney Glass Works.  Later, by 1909, it became the Whitney Glass Works Company.  The plant was purchased by Owens Bottle Company in 1918 and was operated as a division.  The markings are on the base of the bottle.
T. W. & Co. Wightman, Thomas, & Company, (1873-1883),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 22 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wightman mark Put bottles made by Wightman on a shelf
Manufactured soda and beer bottles.  The firm became a limited company in 1883 and in 1896, it became the Thomas Wightman Glass Company, but was dissolved in early in the twentieth century.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle. 
WILLIAMSTOWN N. J. Williamstown Glass Works, (approx: 1851-approx: 1894),
Williamstown, NJ, United States, Occurs on 3 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Williamstown mark Put bottles made by Williamstown Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles. This works started in 1835.  From 1842 to 1846 Joel Bodine was the sole owner.  Later, it was  Joel Bodine & Sons.  The Bodines operated the factory as the Washington Glass Works, but in the early 1850 it became the Williamstown Glass Works and is listed on a 1853 price list.  In 1855 it was operated by Bodine Brothers and in 1867 it became Bodine, Thomas  & Company.  Sometime between 1887 and 1894, the name changed to the Bodine Glass Company.  From 1899 to after 1920, it was the Williamstown Glass Company to 1899-1920.  The markings are on the front face of the bottle
WINSLOW N. J. Winslow Glass Works, (approx: 1831-1892),
Winslow, NJ, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Winslow mark Put bottles made by Winslow Glass Works on a shelf
Manufactured beer bottles.  These works were established by the Coffins, who established the Hammonton Glass Works.  Later the firm became Coffin & Hay.  By 1847, it became Coffin, Hay & Bowdle.  The works was operated by Andrew & John Hay or their heirs until 1884, when the works was leased to Tillyer Brothers.  The works burned in 1892 and was not rebuilt.  The markings are on the reverse of the bottle.
WIS. G. Co. MILW. WIS. GLASS Co MILW WGC Wisconsin Glass Company, (1881-1886),
Milwaukee, WI, United States, Occurs on 21 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wisconsin mark Put bottles made by Wisconsin Glass Co. on a shelf
Manufactured beer and soda bottles.  The company was organized to purchase the Chase Valley Glass Companies from Dr. Enoch Chase and other investors in 1881.  The company's production a wide variety of bottle and glassware, and competition from Indiana plants fueled by cheap natural gas led to its undoing.  The company faced significant financial problems that led to a labor strike when the company reduced wages.  This closed the factory in 1886.  The markings appear on the base and occasionally on the heel of the bottle.
WITTEMANN BROS N. Y. Wittemann Brothers, (1876-approx: 1929),
New York, NY, United States, (1876-approx: 1920) Occurs on 11 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wittemann Bros. mark Put bottles made by Wittemann Bros. on a shelf
Buffalo, NY, United States, (approx: 1920-approx: 1929)
Appears on beer bottles.  This firm was founded in 1876 by Adolf, Rudolph, and Jacob Wittemann as a lithography company.  Producing images of photographs that Adolf had taken around the United States and Canada.  They started making labels for bottlers and moved into the bottling supply business.  With two different businesses being operated, in 1887, Adolf withdrew to form the Albertype Company, which focused on lithography, and Wittemann Brothers concentrated on the bottling and brewing supply business.  The company grew to a large extent, but was affected by quarrelling and National Prohibition. It was incorporated in 1908, but seemed to use the same name.  It was moved to Buffalo in about 1920.  The firm was still operating in 1929.   The markings are on the base of the bottle.  Notes
E. W. & Co. Wormser, Ephraim, & Company, (1857-1876),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 1 bottle, Show distribution map of bottles with the Wormser mark Put bottles made by Worsmer on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  In 1854, Wormser, Burgraff & Company established a glass factory known as the Pittsburgh Green Glass Company.  During the 1857 depression, the firm became E. Wormser & Company with the introduction of William Frank, Ephraim's brother-in-law.  The two also established another factory under the name of W. Frank & Company in 1858.  Both were partners in the other's named works.  In 1876, with the withdraw of William Frank, the firm became the Wormser Glass Company.  The markings are on the face of the bottle.
W G & Co Worsmer Glass Company, (1876-1929),
Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Occurs on 5 bottles, Show distribution map of bottles with the Worsmer mark Put bottles made by Worsmer on a shelf
Manufactured soda bottles.  This company was formed with the dissolution of Ephraim Wormser & Company in 1876.  Beer and wine bottles were listed as a specialty in 1908.  The works were listed as idle in 1929.  The markings appear on the base of the bottle.